Brain resistance to intracerebral superinfections develops after a peripheral inoculation of neurovirulent viruses. Superinfection resistance combines specificity, toward the virus used for the peripheral inoculum, and short-term duration after the inoculum. In order to study this unusual combination, neurovirulent superinfections were made on albino Swiss mice previously infected with a nasal inoculum. A herpesvirus strain SC16, or a homologue recombinant virus carrying the reporter lac Z gene or a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) (a virus taxonomically unrelated to Herpesviridae) were used. The mice underwent a neurological examination and their survival rate was recorded. The brains superinfected with the reporter virus were stained for the β-galactosidase reaction to trace the virus spread and the inflammatory infiltrates were characterized immunocytochemically. The results confirm and extend previous observations about virus specificity and short-term duration of superinfection resistance. They show, moreover, an enhanced brain inflammation with T-cells and macrophages infiltrating the tissue around microvessels, at a time when both neurovirulence and the spread of herpesvirus in the brain are reduced. The results suggest that the immune response to superinfection in the nervous tissue is enhanced by blood-brain barrier mechanisms that promote the timely extravasation of immune cells.

Brain resistance to HSV-1 encephalitis in a mouse model

FAVERO, Morgana;
2002-01-01

Abstract

Brain resistance to intracerebral superinfections develops after a peripheral inoculation of neurovirulent viruses. Superinfection resistance combines specificity, toward the virus used for the peripheral inoculum, and short-term duration after the inoculum. In order to study this unusual combination, neurovirulent superinfections were made on albino Swiss mice previously infected with a nasal inoculum. A herpesvirus strain SC16, or a homologue recombinant virus carrying the reporter lac Z gene or a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) (a virus taxonomically unrelated to Herpesviridae) were used. The mice underwent a neurological examination and their survival rate was recorded. The brains superinfected with the reporter virus were stained for the β-galactosidase reaction to trace the virus spread and the inflammatory infiltrates were characterized immunocytochemically. The results confirm and extend previous observations about virus specificity and short-term duration of superinfection resistance. They show, moreover, an enhanced brain inflammation with T-cells and macrophages infiltrating the tissue around microvessels, at a time when both neurovirulence and the spread of herpesvirus in the brain are reduced. The results suggest that the immune response to superinfection in the nervous tissue is enhanced by blood-brain barrier mechanisms that promote the timely extravasation of immune cells.
β-galactosidase; Encephalitis; HSV-1; Superinfection; VSV;
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/311913
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