In developed countries, 98% of all women receive prenatal care and 94% give birth under the supervision of skilled healthcare practitioners with timely access to appropriate emergency treatment if complications arise. In contrast, large numbers of pregnant women in Africa and Asia do not receive adequate prenatal care and lack skilled attendance at birth. In developing countries quality of prenatal care is often scarce: models of care adopted in the western world and exported to the developing world have not been monitored early enough to discover their weak points promptly. This blind attitude has transformed antenatal care into an empty and useless ritual, and explains why antenatal care programmes continue to be unsuccessful, being inappropriate to the specific situation. A mix of educational and cultural factors together with persistent lack of resources in a global critical situation all contribute to the poor results of antenatal care programmes. Antenatal care services should be free of charge, planned and implemented within the community, cost-effective, and should yield evidence-based quality care. They should also include information for the patient and family members, provide affordable treatment of existing conditions, and warrant referral for complications. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Antenatal care in developing countries: The need for a tailored model.

ZANCONATO, Giovanni;FRANCHI, Massimo Piergiuseppe
2006-01-01

Abstract

In developed countries, 98% of all women receive prenatal care and 94% give birth under the supervision of skilled healthcare practitioners with timely access to appropriate emergency treatment if complications arise. In contrast, large numbers of pregnant women in Africa and Asia do not receive adequate prenatal care and lack skilled attendance at birth. In developing countries quality of prenatal care is often scarce: models of care adopted in the western world and exported to the developing world have not been monitored early enough to discover their weak points promptly. This blind attitude has transformed antenatal care into an empty and useless ritual, and explains why antenatal care programmes continue to be unsuccessful, being inappropriate to the specific situation. A mix of educational and cultural factors together with persistent lack of resources in a global critical situation all contribute to the poor results of antenatal care programmes. Antenatal care services should be free of charge, planned and implemented within the community, cost-effective, and should yield evidence-based quality care. They should also include information for the patient and family members, provide affordable treatment of existing conditions, and warrant referral for complications. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
2006
antenatal care; reproductive health; maternal mortality
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/30701
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