Surface color is traditionally measured by matching methods. However, in some conditions, the color of certain surfaces cannot be measured: The surface simply looks brighter or darker than all the patches on a matching scale. We studied the reliability, validity, and range of application of three different types of simulated Munsell scales (white-, black-, and split-surrounded) as methods for measuring surface colors in simple disk–ring displays. All the scales were equally reliable for matching both increments and decrements, but about 20% of the increments were unmatchable on the white-surrounded scale, about 13% of the decrements were unmatchable on the black-surrounded scale, and about 9% of the increments were unmatchable on the split-surrounded scale. However, matches on all the scales were linearly related. Therefore, it is possible to convert them to common units, using regression parameters. These units provide an extended metric for measuring all increments and decrements in the stimulus space, effectively removing ceiling and floor effects, and providing measures even for surfaces that were perceived as out of range on some of the scales.

Measuring surface achromatic color: Toward a common measure for increments and decrements.

GALMONTE, Alessandra;
2003-01-01

Abstract

Surface color is traditionally measured by matching methods. However, in some conditions, the color of certain surfaces cannot be measured: The surface simply looks brighter or darker than all the patches on a matching scale. We studied the reliability, validity, and range of application of three different types of simulated Munsell scales (white-, black-, and split-surrounded) as methods for measuring surface colors in simple disk–ring displays. All the scales were equally reliable for matching both increments and decrements, but about 20% of the increments were unmatchable on the white-surrounded scale, about 13% of the decrements were unmatchable on the black-surrounded scale, and about 9% of the increments were unmatchable on the split-surrounded scale. However, matches on all the scales were linearly related. Therefore, it is possible to convert them to common units, using regression parameters. These units provide an extended metric for measuring all increments and decrements in the stimulus space, effectively removing ceiling and floor effects, and providing measures even for surfaces that were perceived as out of range on some of the scales.
lightness; measurement; surface color
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/305967
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