OBJECTIVE: The primary objective of this study was to describe the antibiotic prescribing patterns in hospital inpatients with pneumonia (PN), exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and urinary tract infections (UTIs). A second objective was to verify if some selected variables (i.e., risk factors, patient age, size of hospitals) were affecting the therapeutic choice. DESIGN: Survey was performed on 1609 patients. The data were collected by physicians using a special form, covering a six-month period. SETTING: Twenty-six medical wards and 8 geriatric wards in 24 acute-care hospitals in the Veneto Region in Northern Italy. PATIENTS: A consecutive sample of PN, COPD, and UTI patients treated with antibiotics. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The following information was collected: patient and hospital demographics, risk factors, diagnoses, and antibiotic regimens. RESULTS: Sixty-three antimicrobial agents used, with 2115 administrations, 1227 of which were single-drug therapy. The most frequently used drugs were third-generation cephalosporins (24.6 percent), fluoroquinolones (15.4 percent), aminopenicillins (15.0 percent), and ureidopenicillins (9.7 percent). There is great variability of therapeutic regimens in the various hospitals for the same disease. However, this variability is not explained by the different types of hospitals or by the patients' characteristics (e.g., age, risk factors). CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics probably is excessive. Moreover, the treatment seems to be based more on the opinion of the treating physician and the local habits rather than objective criteria. These factors may have negative repercussions not only in economic terms, but also in terms of alteration of the bacterial ecology.

Antibiotic prescribing patterns in Italian hospital inpatients with pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and urinary tract infections

LEONE, Roberto;MORETTI, Ugo;VELO, Giampaolo
1993

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The primary objective of this study was to describe the antibiotic prescribing patterns in hospital inpatients with pneumonia (PN), exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and urinary tract infections (UTIs). A second objective was to verify if some selected variables (i.e., risk factors, patient age, size of hospitals) were affecting the therapeutic choice. DESIGN: Survey was performed on 1609 patients. The data were collected by physicians using a special form, covering a six-month period. SETTING: Twenty-six medical wards and 8 geriatric wards in 24 acute-care hospitals in the Veneto Region in Northern Italy. PATIENTS: A consecutive sample of PN, COPD, and UTI patients treated with antibiotics. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The following information was collected: patient and hospital demographics, risk factors, diagnoses, and antibiotic regimens. RESULTS: Sixty-three antimicrobial agents used, with 2115 administrations, 1227 of which were single-drug therapy. The most frequently used drugs were third-generation cephalosporins (24.6 percent), fluoroquinolones (15.4 percent), aminopenicillins (15.0 percent), and ureidopenicillins (9.7 percent). There is great variability of therapeutic regimens in the various hospitals for the same disease. However, this variability is not explained by the different types of hospitals or by the patients' characteristics (e.g., age, risk factors). CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics probably is excessive. Moreover, the treatment seems to be based more on the opinion of the treating physician and the local habits rather than objective criteria. These factors may have negative repercussions not only in economic terms, but also in terms of alteration of the bacterial ecology.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/305858
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