Many of the known roles of arginine (e.g. in immune function, wound healing, and protection against ammonia intoxication) are mediated by a metabolic pathway synthesising nitric oxide (NO) in the liver. Contrary to some of the current views, liver-produced NO may be basically beneficial, as it exerts both protective actions against tissue injury and cytotoxic effects on invading microorganisms, parasites, or tumor cells. An ongoing equilibrium between NO and other NO-reactive compounds (e.g. O2 and non-heme iron-sulphur-containing moieties) appears to be important in this respect, even under critical conditions. Thus, NO may prevent liver tissue harm from oxidant stress. Only when this putative counterbalance is upset by an uncontrolled, prolonged and/or massive production of NO, liver tissue damage may occur leading to hepatic inflammation or even tumor development. Moreover, the currently available data support the working hypothesis that hepatocytes partake not only to immunoregulatory processes, but even to immune defence mechanisms. Thus, the liver constitutes an excellent model for investigations into the crosstalks regulating the production of NO which take place among not only the various networks operating inside a single hepatic cell, but even the individual types of liver cells.

Nitric oxide in the liver: physiopathological roles

Suzuki H.;Menegazzi M.;Carcereri de Prati A.;Mariotto S.;Armato U.
1995-01-01

Abstract

Many of the known roles of arginine (e.g. in immune function, wound healing, and protection against ammonia intoxication) are mediated by a metabolic pathway synthesising nitric oxide (NO) in the liver. Contrary to some of the current views, liver-produced NO may be basically beneficial, as it exerts both protective actions against tissue injury and cytotoxic effects on invading microorganisms, parasites, or tumor cells. An ongoing equilibrium between NO and other NO-reactive compounds (e.g. O2 and non-heme iron-sulphur-containing moieties) appears to be important in this respect, even under critical conditions. Thus, NO may prevent liver tissue harm from oxidant stress. Only when this putative counterbalance is upset by an uncontrolled, prolonged and/or massive production of NO, liver tissue damage may occur leading to hepatic inflammation or even tumor development. Moreover, the currently available data support the working hypothesis that hepatocytes partake not only to immunoregulatory processes, but even to immune defence mechanisms. Thus, the liver constitutes an excellent model for investigations into the crosstalks regulating the production of NO which take place among not only the various networks operating inside a single hepatic cell, but even the individual types of liver cells.
antioxidants; Inducibile nitric oxide synthase; liver; tissue damage; tissue protection;
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/305782
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