The origin and fate of cortical ischemic lesions, showing a stratified appearance at in vivo MRI-examination, was studied on rats in which a focal brain ischemia was induced by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. One week after ischemia induction, six rats were selected in which three layers of different intensity were visible in the lesioned cortex. Two animals were sacrificed and studied by histology and electron microscopy. The external hyperintense layer was composed of pial and lesioned nervous tissue, the intermediate of degenerating nervous tissue in which an accumulation of macrophages was found, the deepest of edematous nerve tissue without a marked accumulation of macrophages. The remaining rats underwent further MRI examinations showing that, in the lesioned areas, cerebral blood volume was 14-69% lower than the contralateral healthy cortex. At histological and ultrastructural examination, a large part of the lesion was occupied by enlarged pial tissue and marginal glia. A dilatation of the ventricular cavity and cystic structures were also visible. In three animals an increase of the transverse diameter of the caudo-putamen ipsilateral to the lesion was found. The study suggests that the layered appearance is mainly due to an accumulation of macrophages in the intermediate layer and that several processes contribute to the occlusion of the space created by the removal of the necrotic tissue in stratified ischemic lesions (i.e. expansion of the pial tissue, thickening of the marginal glia; expansion of the caudo-putamen, enlargement of the ventricular cavity and development of cystic structures).

Correlation MRI/ultrastructure in cerebral ischemic lesions: application to the interpretation of cortical layered areas

SBARBATI, Andrea;NICOLATO, Elena;BERNARDI, Paolo;LUNATI, Ernesto;MARZOLA, Pasquina;OSCULATI, Francesco
2002-01-01

Abstract

The origin and fate of cortical ischemic lesions, showing a stratified appearance at in vivo MRI-examination, was studied on rats in which a focal brain ischemia was induced by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. One week after ischemia induction, six rats were selected in which three layers of different intensity were visible in the lesioned cortex. Two animals were sacrificed and studied by histology and electron microscopy. The external hyperintense layer was composed of pial and lesioned nervous tissue, the intermediate of degenerating nervous tissue in which an accumulation of macrophages was found, the deepest of edematous nerve tissue without a marked accumulation of macrophages. The remaining rats underwent further MRI examinations showing that, in the lesioned areas, cerebral blood volume was 14-69% lower than the contralateral healthy cortex. At histological and ultrastructural examination, a large part of the lesion was occupied by enlarged pial tissue and marginal glia. A dilatation of the ventricular cavity and cystic structures were also visible. In three animals an increase of the transverse diameter of the caudo-putamen ipsilateral to the lesion was found. The study suggests that the layered appearance is mainly due to an accumulation of macrophages in the intermediate layer and that several processes contribute to the occlusion of the space created by the removal of the necrotic tissue in stratified ischemic lesions (i.e. expansion of the pial tissue, thickening of the marginal glia; expansion of the caudo-putamen, enlargement of the ventricular cavity and development of cystic structures).
Stroke, MRI, Ultrastructure, Rat, MCAO
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/304462
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