Revascularization can improve ventricular function in patients with viable myocardium, but whether and how the presence of viable myocardium affects prognosis of infarcted patients is still far from clear. Thus, 202 patients (173 men, 59 +/- 9 years old) with a previous or recent myocardial infarction (MI) and regional asynergies underwent low-dose dobutamine echocardiography (5-15 mug/kg per min) to assess myocardial viability and were followed for a period of 16 +/- 11 months after revascularization (89 patients) or medical therapy (113 patients). Four groups of patients were defined: (1) patients with viability, revascularized (n = 64); (2) patients with viability, treated medically (n = 52) ; (3) patients without viability, revascularized (n = 25); and (4) patients without viability, treated medically (n = 61). Of these patients, 45 (23%) patients suffered 57 cardiac events: 18 cardiac deaths (9%), 7 MIs, 12 unstable angina, 9 heart failures, and 11 new revascularization procedures. Patients with viability, revascularized, experienced a slightly lower event rate (22%) compared with patients with viability, treated medically, patients without viability, treated medically and patients without viability, revascularized (29%, 31%, and 36%, respectively; p = not significant [NS]). The frequency of events was then evaluated in those 108 patients with an ejection fraction <=33%, in whom 14 cardiac deaths occurred: the incidence of cardiac death was slightly lower in patients with viability, revascularized (3/37, 8%) than in the patients with viability, treated medically (4/26, 15%), patients without viability, revascularized (2/11, 18%), or patients without viability, treated medically (5/34, 15%) (p = NS). Nonfatal cardiac events were significantly fewer (p <0.05) in patients with viability, revascularized (8%) and in patients without viability, treated medically (6%) than in patients with viability, treated medically and patients without viability, revascularized (27%). In infarcted patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction, the presence of viable myocardium, if left unrevascularized, leads to further events. On the contrary, in the absence of myocardial viability, revascularization could lead to a worse prognosis than medical therapy.

Prognostic value of detection of myocardial viability using low-dose dobutamine echocardiography in infarcted patients

CICOIRA, Mariantonietta;MARINO, Paolo;ZARDINI, Pierino
1998-01-01

Abstract

Revascularization can improve ventricular function in patients with viable myocardium, but whether and how the presence of viable myocardium affects prognosis of infarcted patients is still far from clear. Thus, 202 patients (173 men, 59 +/- 9 years old) with a previous or recent myocardial infarction (MI) and regional asynergies underwent low-dose dobutamine echocardiography (5-15 mug/kg per min) to assess myocardial viability and were followed for a period of 16 +/- 11 months after revascularization (89 patients) or medical therapy (113 patients). Four groups of patients were defined: (1) patients with viability, revascularized (n = 64); (2) patients with viability, treated medically (n = 52) ; (3) patients without viability, revascularized (n = 25); and (4) patients without viability, treated medically (n = 61). Of these patients, 45 (23%) patients suffered 57 cardiac events: 18 cardiac deaths (9%), 7 MIs, 12 unstable angina, 9 heart failures, and 11 new revascularization procedures. Patients with viability, revascularized, experienced a slightly lower event rate (22%) compared with patients with viability, treated medically, patients without viability, treated medically and patients without viability, revascularized (29%, 31%, and 36%, respectively; p = not significant [NS]). The frequency of events was then evaluated in those 108 patients with an ejection fraction <=33%, in whom 14 cardiac deaths occurred: the incidence of cardiac death was slightly lower in patients with viability, revascularized (3/37, 8%) than in the patients with viability, treated medically (4/26, 15%), patients without viability, revascularized (2/11, 18%), or patients without viability, treated medically (5/34, 15%) (p = NS). Nonfatal cardiac events were significantly fewer (p <0.05) in patients with viability, revascularized (8%) and in patients without viability, treated medically (6%) than in patients with viability, treated medically and patients without viability, revascularized (27%). In infarcted patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction, the presence of viable myocardium, if left unrevascularized, leads to further events. On the contrary, in the absence of myocardial viability, revascularization could lead to a worse prognosis than medical therapy.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/304180
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