The aim of this study was to evaluate whether interferon alfa (IFN-alpha) treatment-associated virological and biochemical remission improves survival in a cohort of 90 white patients with compensated cirrhosis caused by hepatitis B (Child A) followed for a mean period of 7 years. Inclusion criteria were biopsy-proven cirrhosis, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) positivity, abnormal serum aminotransferase levels, exclusion of hepatitis delta virus, and absence of complications of cirrhosis. Of the 40 IFN-treated patients, 27 (67%) showed sustained HBeAg loss with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) normalization. Of the 50 untreated patients, 30 (60%) cleared HBeAg, but only 21 (42%) normalized ALT after HBeAg loss. Compared with the untreated patients, IFN-treated patients had similar cumulative rates of HBeAg clearance (P = .48), but higher rates of ALT normalization (P = .016) and of HBsAg loss (P = .028). During follow-up, liver-related death occurred in 8 treated patients, caused by liver failure in 5 and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in 3; all 8 had continued to be HBeAg-positive with elevated ALT. None of the treated patients undergoing remission developed liver-related complications. At univariate analysis, life expectancy was longer in treated patients showing sustained remission than in those who did not (5-year survival: 100% vs. 81%; P = .048). Fourteen untreated patients died (from liver failure in 10 and HCC in 4); all but 3 had continued to be HBeAg-positive with elevated ALT. Cox's model identified age and ALT normalization as the only significant predictors of survival. In conclusion, in patients with HBeAg-positive compensated cirrhosis, virological and biochemical remission following IFN therapy is associated with improved survival.

Long-term outcome of Hepatitis B e Antigen positive patients with compensated cirrhosis treated with interferon alfa

FATTOVICH, Giovanna;CORROCHER, Roberto;
1997

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate whether interferon alfa (IFN-alpha) treatment-associated virological and biochemical remission improves survival in a cohort of 90 white patients with compensated cirrhosis caused by hepatitis B (Child A) followed for a mean period of 7 years. Inclusion criteria were biopsy-proven cirrhosis, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) positivity, abnormal serum aminotransferase levels, exclusion of hepatitis delta virus, and absence of complications of cirrhosis. Of the 40 IFN-treated patients, 27 (67%) showed sustained HBeAg loss with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) normalization. Of the 50 untreated patients, 30 (60%) cleared HBeAg, but only 21 (42%) normalized ALT after HBeAg loss. Compared with the untreated patients, IFN-treated patients had similar cumulative rates of HBeAg clearance (P = .48), but higher rates of ALT normalization (P = .016) and of HBsAg loss (P = .028). During follow-up, liver-related death occurred in 8 treated patients, caused by liver failure in 5 and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in 3; all 8 had continued to be HBeAg-positive with elevated ALT. None of the treated patients undergoing remission developed liver-related complications. At univariate analysis, life expectancy was longer in treated patients showing sustained remission than in those who did not (5-year survival: 100% vs. 81%; P = .048). Fourteen untreated patients died (from liver failure in 10 and HCC in 4); all but 3 had continued to be HBeAg-positive with elevated ALT. Cox's model identified age and ALT normalization as the only significant predictors of survival. In conclusion, in patients with HBeAg-positive compensated cirrhosis, virological and biochemical remission following IFN therapy is associated with improved survival.
cirrhosis type B; hepatitis B e Antigen; clinical outcome; interferon therapy
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/2365
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