The primary objective of this review is to discuss risk factors for asthma development in food allergen-sensitized children. In the paper we discuss the possible measures to prevent progression to asthma by allergen and other adjuvant factor avoidance. DATA SOURCES: A review from literature of articles on these topics was performed. STUDY SELECTION: Relevant publications on asthma risk factors and implementation of protective factors were critically evaluated. RESULTS: Children with familiar history of atopy and sensitization to food proteins in early infancy are at high risk of subsequent respiratory allergic diseases and require specific prevention. Because early allergic sensitization is a significant risk factor for later development of asthma, prevention of asthma by early allergen avoidance is mandatory in high-risk children. Adjuvant factors such as tobacco smoke and mold exposure may act as nonspecific triggers for the development of atopy. The role of protective factors such as infections in early life, breast-feeding, a "healthy" diet needs to be evaluated in prospective studies. Pharmacologic intervention with antihistamines led to significant reduction in incidence of asthma in high-risk children, but confirmatory longitudinal studies in large populations are necessary. CONCLUSIONS: There is now accumulating evidence that preventing exposure to house-dust mite may significantly reduce the prevalence of childhood asthma. However, allergen avoidance can not be recommended as the only strategy. Avoidance of adjuvant factors and implementation of potential protective factors aimed to reduce the risk to progression to asthma need to be evaluated in prospective studies.

Food Allergy: what can be done to prevent progression to asthma?

Peroni, Diego;BONER, Attilio
2002

Abstract

The primary objective of this review is to discuss risk factors for asthma development in food allergen-sensitized children. In the paper we discuss the possible measures to prevent progression to asthma by allergen and other adjuvant factor avoidance. DATA SOURCES: A review from literature of articles on these topics was performed. STUDY SELECTION: Relevant publications on asthma risk factors and implementation of protective factors were critically evaluated. RESULTS: Children with familiar history of atopy and sensitization to food proteins in early infancy are at high risk of subsequent respiratory allergic diseases and require specific prevention. Because early allergic sensitization is a significant risk factor for later development of asthma, prevention of asthma by early allergen avoidance is mandatory in high-risk children. Adjuvant factors such as tobacco smoke and mold exposure may act as nonspecific triggers for the development of atopy. The role of protective factors such as infections in early life, breast-feeding, a "healthy" diet needs to be evaluated in prospective studies. Pharmacologic intervention with antihistamines led to significant reduction in incidence of asthma in high-risk children, but confirmatory longitudinal studies in large populations are necessary. CONCLUSIONS: There is now accumulating evidence that preventing exposure to house-dust mite may significantly reduce the prevalence of childhood asthma. However, allergen avoidance can not be recommended as the only strategy. Avoidance of adjuvant factors and implementation of potential protective factors aimed to reduce the risk to progression to asthma need to be evaluated in prospective studies.
Risk factors; asthma; children; food allergen-sensitized
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/23003
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 3
  • Scopus 18
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact