In healthy adults and children, deep inhalation (DI) is able to reverse induced bronchoconstriction. This ability is impaired in asthma, but the reasons are still to be elucidated. This study investigated whether the bronchodilator effect of DI during methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction can be improved by allergen avoidance in asthmatic children, and its relationship with airway inflammation. The effect of DI on methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction was studied at the beginning and the end of a 3-month allergen avoidance period at high altitude in 14 allergic asthmatic children who had severe asthma attacks. Changes in airway caliber were inferred from the respiratory resistance (Rrs) measured by a forced oscillation technique. Results were related to the percentage of eosinophils in induced sputum and compared with those obtained in 9 age-matched nonasthmatic children. In asthmatic subjects, DI had no significant effect on methacholine-induced increase in Rrs before (P = .62) but significantly reversed it after (P < .01) allergen avoidance. However, the ability of DI to reverse a methacholine-induced increase in Rrs tended to remain less in asthmatic than nonasthmatic children even after allergen avoidance (P = .05). In the asthmatic children, the percentage of eosinophils in induced sputum was decreased at the end of the allergen avoidance period (P < .001), without any significant correlation between sputum eosinophils and airway responsiveness to methacholine or effect of DI. A short period of allergen avoidance may improve the ability of DI to reverse induced bronchoconstriction in some asthmatic children. This effect is associated, yet not correlated, with a reduction in airway inflammation.

Improved bronchodilator effect of deep inhalation after allergen avoidance in asthmatic children

Peroni, Diego;BONER, Attilio;
2004

Abstract

In healthy adults and children, deep inhalation (DI) is able to reverse induced bronchoconstriction. This ability is impaired in asthma, but the reasons are still to be elucidated. This study investigated whether the bronchodilator effect of DI during methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction can be improved by allergen avoidance in asthmatic children, and its relationship with airway inflammation. The effect of DI on methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction was studied at the beginning and the end of a 3-month allergen avoidance period at high altitude in 14 allergic asthmatic children who had severe asthma attacks. Changes in airway caliber were inferred from the respiratory resistance (Rrs) measured by a forced oscillation technique. Results were related to the percentage of eosinophils in induced sputum and compared with those obtained in 9 age-matched nonasthmatic children. In asthmatic subjects, DI had no significant effect on methacholine-induced increase in Rrs before (P = .62) but significantly reversed it after (P < .01) allergen avoidance. However, the ability of DI to reverse a methacholine-induced increase in Rrs tended to remain less in asthmatic than nonasthmatic children even after allergen avoidance (P = .05). In the asthmatic children, the percentage of eosinophils in induced sputum was decreased at the end of the allergen avoidance period (P < .001), without any significant correlation between sputum eosinophils and airway responsiveness to methacholine or effect of DI. A short period of allergen avoidance may improve the ability of DI to reverse induced bronchoconstriction in some asthmatic children. This effect is associated, yet not correlated, with a reduction in airway inflammation.
Respiratory resistance; forced oscillation technique; eosinophils; methacholine challenge
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/22925
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