Increased free radical production and hyperinsulinemia are thought to play a role in experimental and human atherosclerosis, but the relation between the 2 abnormalities has not been studied. In 23 healthy volunteers, we measured the susceptibility of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol particles to in vitro copper sulfate oxidation (measured as the lag phase) and cell-mediated oxidative modification (measured as malondialdehyde generation in LDL during incubation with human umbilical vein endothelial cells), as well as the vitamin E content of LDL cholesterol at baseline and after 2 hours of physiological hyperinsulinemia (euglycemic insulin clamp). The lag time of LDL oxidation decreased from control values of 108+/-3 and 107+/-3 minutes (at baseline and after 2 hours of saline infusion) to 101+/-3 minutes after 2 hours of clamping (P<0.0001). At corresponding times, cell-mediated malondialdehyde generation in LDL rose from 4.96+/-0.11 and 4.98+/-0.10 to 5.28+/-0.10 nmol/L (P=0. 0006), whereas the LDL vitamin E content decreased from 6.78+/-0.06 and 6.77+/-0.06 to 6.64+/-0.06 microg/mg (P<0.04). The insulin-induced shortening of the lag phase was directly related to the decrement of vitamin E in LDL; furthermore, in subjects with higher baseline serum triglyceride levels, insulin induced a greater shortening of the lag phase than in subjects with low baseline triglycerides. We conclude that in healthy humans acute physiological hyperinsulinemia enhances the oxidative susceptibility of LDL cholesterol particles. This effect may have pathogenic significance for atherogenesis in insulin resistant states.

Evidence that acute insulin administration enhances LDL cholesterol susceptibility to oxidation in healthy humans

GARBIN, Ulisse;FRATTA PASINI, Anna Maria;COMINACINI, Luciano;
1999

Abstract

Increased free radical production and hyperinsulinemia are thought to play a role in experimental and human atherosclerosis, but the relation between the 2 abnormalities has not been studied. In 23 healthy volunteers, we measured the susceptibility of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol particles to in vitro copper sulfate oxidation (measured as the lag phase) and cell-mediated oxidative modification (measured as malondialdehyde generation in LDL during incubation with human umbilical vein endothelial cells), as well as the vitamin E content of LDL cholesterol at baseline and after 2 hours of physiological hyperinsulinemia (euglycemic insulin clamp). The lag time of LDL oxidation decreased from control values of 108+/-3 and 107+/-3 minutes (at baseline and after 2 hours of saline infusion) to 101+/-3 minutes after 2 hours of clamping (P<0.0001). At corresponding times, cell-mediated malondialdehyde generation in LDL rose from 4.96+/-0.11 and 4.98+/-0.10 to 5.28+/-0.10 nmol/L (P=0. 0006), whereas the LDL vitamin E content decreased from 6.78+/-0.06 and 6.77+/-0.06 to 6.64+/-0.06 microg/mg (P<0.04). The insulin-induced shortening of the lag phase was directly related to the decrement of vitamin E in LDL; furthermore, in subjects with higher baseline serum triglyceride levels, insulin induced a greater shortening of the lag phase than in subjects with low baseline triglycerides. We conclude that in healthy humans acute physiological hyperinsulinemia enhances the oxidative susceptibility of LDL cholesterol particles. This effect may have pathogenic significance for atherogenesis in insulin resistant states.
oxidized LDL; susceptibility of LDL to oxidation; insulin
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/13815
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