High serum levels of soluble CD30 (sCD30) have been reported to better predict the response to second line therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is believed that sCD30 is released by CD30+ T cells present in the RA synovium. However, both the mechanism of recruitment to the joint and the functional role of this T cell subset in the pathogenesis of the disease remain unknown. This study confirmed higher levels of sCD30 in the serum and synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients compared with normal controls. However, analysis of mRNA and cell surface CD30 expression showed that CD30+ T cells are detectable in the SF, but not in the synovial membrane. In contrast, T cells expressing the CD30 transcript, but not the surface molecule, were found in the peripheral blood of both RA and normal controls. CD30 surface expression was up-regulated by adhesion and migration through endothelium in vitro and in a delayed-type hypersensitivity model in vivo. Although the great majority of fresh or cloned CD30+ T cells from SF produced both IFN-gamma and IL-4, CD30 expression strictly correlated with IL-4 synthesis in synovial T cell clones. In addition, CD30+ T cell clones also produced high amounts of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. On this basis, we would like to propose that synovial CD30+ cells may play a role in the control of the inflammatory response. Serum sCD30 may reflect such cell activity and, therefore, explain the previously demonstrated correlation between high sCD30 serum levels and positive response to therapy.

CD30+ T cells in rheumatoid synovitis: mechanisms of recruitment and functional role.

LUNARDI, Claudio
2000

Abstract

High serum levels of soluble CD30 (sCD30) have been reported to better predict the response to second line therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is believed that sCD30 is released by CD30+ T cells present in the RA synovium. However, both the mechanism of recruitment to the joint and the functional role of this T cell subset in the pathogenesis of the disease remain unknown. This study confirmed higher levels of sCD30 in the serum and synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients compared with normal controls. However, analysis of mRNA and cell surface CD30 expression showed that CD30+ T cells are detectable in the SF, but not in the synovial membrane. In contrast, T cells expressing the CD30 transcript, but not the surface molecule, were found in the peripheral blood of both RA and normal controls. CD30 surface expression was up-regulated by adhesion and migration through endothelium in vitro and in a delayed-type hypersensitivity model in vivo. Although the great majority of fresh or cloned CD30+ T cells from SF produced both IFN-gamma and IL-4, CD30 expression strictly correlated with IL-4 synthesis in synovial T cell clones. In addition, CD30+ T cell clones also produced high amounts of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. On this basis, we would like to propose that synovial CD30+ cells may play a role in the control of the inflammatory response. Serum sCD30 may reflect such cell activity and, therefore, explain the previously demonstrated correlation between high sCD30 serum levels and positive response to therapy.
CD30+T cells; soluble CD30; RA
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/11341
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