The rising prevalence of metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease (MASLD) poses a significant global health challenge, affecting over 30% of adults worldwide. MASLD is linked to increased mortality rates and substantial healthcare costs, primarily driven by its progression to metabolic dysfunction-associated steatohepatitis (MASH), which can lead to severe liver complications including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite its growing burden, effective pharmacotherapy for MASLD/MASH has been lacking until the recent conditional approval of resmetirom by the FDA. Resmetirom, a liver-targeted thyroid hormone receptor-beta selective drug, has shown promise in clinical trials for treating non-cirrhotic MASH with moderate to advanced fibrosis. It has demonstrated efficacy in reducing hepatic fat content, improving liver histology (both MASH resolution and fibrosis improvement), and ameliorating biomarkers of liver damage without significant effects on body weight or glucose metabolism. Notably, resmetirom also exhibits favourable effects on circulating lipids, potentially reducing cardiovascular risk in MASLD/MASH patients. The safety profile of resmetirom appears acceptable, with gastrointestinal adverse events being the most common, though generally mild or moderate. However, long-term surveillance is warranted to monitor for potential risks related to thyroid, gonadal, or bone diseases. Clinical implementation of resmetirom faces challenges in patient selection and monitoring treatment response, and will heavily rely on non-invasive tests for liver fibrosis assessment. Nonetheless, resmetirom represents a landmark breakthrough in MASLD/MASH treatment, paving the way for future therapeutic strategies aiming to mitigate the multifaceted risks associated with this complex metabolic liver disease.

The first MASH drug therapy on the horizon: Current perspectives of resmetirom

Targher, Giovanni
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
2024-01-01

Abstract

The rising prevalence of metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease (MASLD) poses a significant global health challenge, affecting over 30% of adults worldwide. MASLD is linked to increased mortality rates and substantial healthcare costs, primarily driven by its progression to metabolic dysfunction-associated steatohepatitis (MASH), which can lead to severe liver complications including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite its growing burden, effective pharmacotherapy for MASLD/MASH has been lacking until the recent conditional approval of resmetirom by the FDA. Resmetirom, a liver-targeted thyroid hormone receptor-beta selective drug, has shown promise in clinical trials for treating non-cirrhotic MASH with moderate to advanced fibrosis. It has demonstrated efficacy in reducing hepatic fat content, improving liver histology (both MASH resolution and fibrosis improvement), and ameliorating biomarkers of liver damage without significant effects on body weight or glucose metabolism. Notably, resmetirom also exhibits favourable effects on circulating lipids, potentially reducing cardiovascular risk in MASLD/MASH patients. The safety profile of resmetirom appears acceptable, with gastrointestinal adverse events being the most common, though generally mild or moderate. However, long-term surveillance is warranted to monitor for potential risks related to thyroid, gonadal, or bone diseases. Clinical implementation of resmetirom faces challenges in patient selection and monitoring treatment response, and will heavily rely on non-invasive tests for liver fibrosis assessment. Nonetheless, resmetirom represents a landmark breakthrough in MASLD/MASH treatment, paving the way for future therapeutic strategies aiming to mitigate the multifaceted risks associated with this complex metabolic liver disease.
2024
resmetirom, NASH, MASLD
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1129066
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