Background Managing central venous catheters in patients with neoplasms is challenging, and peripherally inserted central catheter PORT (PICC-PORT) has emerged as a promising option for safety and efficacy. However, understanding the clinical progression of catheter-related thrombosis (CRT) in cancer patients with central venous catheters remains limited, especially in certain neoplasm types associated with a higher risk of venous thrombosis. Objectives This study aims to assess the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided management in detecting and treating asymptomatic CRT in cancer patients with PICC. Methods In this prospective cohort study of 120 patients with solid neoplasms receiving chemotherapy, we investigated the incidence of isolated upper-extremity superficial vein thrombosis, upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis, and fibrin sheath formation through ultrasound follow-up at 30 and 90 days after catheter insertion. We analyzed risk factors associated with CRT and compared incidence rates between PICC-PORT and traditional PICC. Results Among the cohort, 69 patients (57.5%) had high-risk thromboembolic neoplasm, and 31 cases (25.8%) of CRT were observed, mostly within 30 days, with only 7 cases (22.6%) showing symptoms. Traditional PICC use (odds ratio, 5.86; 95% CI, 1.14-30) and high-risk thromboembolic neoplasm (odds ratio, 4.46; 95% CI, 1.26-15.81) were identified as independent risk factors for CRT. Conclusion The majority of CRT present asymptomatically within the first 30 days of venous catheter insertion in patients with solid neoplasms. Ultrasound follow-up is valuable for detecting asymptomatic CRT. The risk of CRT was lower with PICC-PORT than with PICC. Additionally, the risk of CRT was found to be higher in patients with high-risk thromboembolic neoplasms. It is crucial for larger studies to confirm the utility of treating asymptomatic thromboses and isolated superficial thrombosis.

Incidence and clinical progression of asymptomatic peripherally inserted central catheter–related thrombosis in solid neoplasm patients: ultrasound insights from a prospective cohort study

Cominacini, Mattia;De Marchi, Sergio;Tosi, Federica;Piccinno, Elia;Dal Corso, Alessandro;Dalla Grana, Elisa;Dalle Carbonare, Luca
2024-01-01

Abstract

Background Managing central venous catheters in patients with neoplasms is challenging, and peripherally inserted central catheter PORT (PICC-PORT) has emerged as a promising option for safety and efficacy. However, understanding the clinical progression of catheter-related thrombosis (CRT) in cancer patients with central venous catheters remains limited, especially in certain neoplasm types associated with a higher risk of venous thrombosis. Objectives This study aims to assess the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided management in detecting and treating asymptomatic CRT in cancer patients with PICC. Methods In this prospective cohort study of 120 patients with solid neoplasms receiving chemotherapy, we investigated the incidence of isolated upper-extremity superficial vein thrombosis, upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis, and fibrin sheath formation through ultrasound follow-up at 30 and 90 days after catheter insertion. We analyzed risk factors associated with CRT and compared incidence rates between PICC-PORT and traditional PICC. Results Among the cohort, 69 patients (57.5%) had high-risk thromboembolic neoplasm, and 31 cases (25.8%) of CRT were observed, mostly within 30 days, with only 7 cases (22.6%) showing symptoms. Traditional PICC use (odds ratio, 5.86; 95% CI, 1.14-30) and high-risk thromboembolic neoplasm (odds ratio, 4.46; 95% CI, 1.26-15.81) were identified as independent risk factors for CRT. Conclusion The majority of CRT present asymptomatically within the first 30 days of venous catheter insertion in patients with solid neoplasms. Ultrasound follow-up is valuable for detecting asymptomatic CRT. The risk of CRT was lower with PICC-PORT than with PICC. Additionally, the risk of CRT was found to be higher in patients with high-risk thromboembolic neoplasms. It is crucial for larger studies to confirm the utility of treating asymptomatic thromboses and isolated superficial thrombosis.
2024
central venous catheter, thrombosis, Doppler, neoplasms, PICC line catheterization, ultrasound imaging, upper exremitiy deep vein thrombosis, vascular access devices
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1128429
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