Gait disorders are the most frequent symptoms associated to multiple sclerosis (MS). Robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) in people with MS (PwMS) has been proposed as a possible effective treatment option for severe motor disability without significant superiority when compared to intensive overground gait training (OGT). Furthermore, RAGT at high intensity may enhance fatigue and spasticity. This study aims to evaluate the effects of a low-intensity RAGT at progressively increasing intensity compared to conventional RAGT and OGT in PwMS and moderate to severe walking impairment. 24 PwMS will be recruited and assigned to one of the three treatment groups: low-intensity RAGT at progressively increasing intensity, conventional RAGT and OGT. All participants will receive 3-weekly treatment sessions of 3 hours each for 4 weeks. In the first 2 hours of treatment, all participants will receive a rehabilitation programme based on stretching exercises, muscle strengthening and educational interventions. During the last hour, subjects will undergo specific gait training according to the assignment group. Outcomes will be assessed before and after treatment and at 3-month follow-up. The primary outcome is walking speed. Secondary outcomes include mobility and balance, psychological measures, muscle oxygen consumption, electrical and haemodynamic brain activity, urinary biomarkers, usability, and acceptability of robotic devices for motor rehabilitation. The results of this study will provide a safe, affordable and non-operator-dependent, intervention for PwMS. Results in terms of functional, psychological, neurophysiological and biological outcomes will confirm our hypothesis. The study's trial registration number: NCT06381440.

Traditional versus progressive robot-assisted gait training in people with multiple sclerosis and severe gait disability: study protocol for the PROGR-EX randomised controlled trial

Gandolfi, Marialuisa;Rimondini, Michela;
2024-01-01

Abstract

Gait disorders are the most frequent symptoms associated to multiple sclerosis (MS). Robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) in people with MS (PwMS) has been proposed as a possible effective treatment option for severe motor disability without significant superiority when compared to intensive overground gait training (OGT). Furthermore, RAGT at high intensity may enhance fatigue and spasticity. This study aims to evaluate the effects of a low-intensity RAGT at progressively increasing intensity compared to conventional RAGT and OGT in PwMS and moderate to severe walking impairment. 24 PwMS will be recruited and assigned to one of the three treatment groups: low-intensity RAGT at progressively increasing intensity, conventional RAGT and OGT. All participants will receive 3-weekly treatment sessions of 3 hours each for 4 weeks. In the first 2 hours of treatment, all participants will receive a rehabilitation programme based on stretching exercises, muscle strengthening and educational interventions. During the last hour, subjects will undergo specific gait training according to the assignment group. Outcomes will be assessed before and after treatment and at 3-month follow-up. The primary outcome is walking speed. Secondary outcomes include mobility and balance, psychological measures, muscle oxygen consumption, electrical and haemodynamic brain activity, urinary biomarkers, usability, and acceptability of robotic devices for motor rehabilitation. The results of this study will provide a safe, affordable and non-operator-dependent, intervention for PwMS. Results in terms of functional, psychological, neurophysiological and biological outcomes will confirm our hypothesis. The study's trial registration number: NCT06381440.
2024
Exercise
Neurological rehabilitation
Rehabilitation
Training
Walking
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1127228
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