Study Objective: To present a large single-center series of hysterectomies for uteri >= 1 kg and to compare the laparoscopic and open abdominal approach in terms of perioperative outcomes and complications.Design: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data (Canadian Task Force classification II-2).Setting: An academic research center.Patients: Consecutive women who underwent hysterectomy for uteri >= 1 kg between January 2000 and December 2016. Patients with a preoperative diagnosis of uterine malignancy or suspected uterine malignancy were excluded. The subjects were divided according to the intended initial surgical approach (i.e., open or laparoscopic). The 2 groups were compared in terms of intraoperative data and postoperative outcomes. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify possible independent predictors of overall complications. A subanalysis including only obese women was accomplished.Interventions: Total laparoscopic versus abdominal hysterectomy (+/- bilateral adnexectomy).Measurements and Main Results: Intra-and postoperative surgical outcomes. A total of 258 patients were included; 55 (21.3%) women were initially approached by open surgery and 203 (78.7%) by laparoscopy. Nine (4.4%) conversions from laparoscopic to open surgery were registered. The median operative time was longer in the laparoscopic group (120 [range, 50-360] vs 85 [range, 35-240] minutes, p = .014). The estimated blood loss (150 [range, 0-1700] vs 200 [50-3000] mL, p = .04), postoperative hemoglobin drop, and hospital stay (1 [range, 1-8] vs 3 [range, 1-8] days, p < .001) were lower among patients operated by laparoscopy. No difference was found between groups in terms of intra-and postoperative complications. However, the overall rate of complications (10.8% vs. 27.2%, p = .015) and the incidence of significant complications (defined as intraoperative adverse events or postoperative Clavien-Dindo >= 2 events, 4.4% vs 10.9%, p = .04) were significantly higher among patients who initially received open surgery. The laparoscopic approach was found to be the only independent predictor of a lower incidence of overall complications (odds ratio = 0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.9). The overall morbidity of minimally invasive hysterectomy was lower also in the subanalysis concerning only obese patients.Conclusion: In experienced hands and in dedicated centers, laparoscopic hysterectomy for uteri weighing >= 1 kg is feasible and safe. Minimally invasive surgery retains its well-known advantages over open surgery even in patients with extremely enlarged uteri. (C) 2017 AAGL. All rights reserved.

Laparoscopic Versus Open Hysterectomy for Benign Disease in Uteri Weighing >1 kg: A Retrospective Analysis on 258 Patients

Stefano Uccella;
2018-01-01

Abstract

Study Objective: To present a large single-center series of hysterectomies for uteri >= 1 kg and to compare the laparoscopic and open abdominal approach in terms of perioperative outcomes and complications.Design: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data (Canadian Task Force classification II-2).Setting: An academic research center.Patients: Consecutive women who underwent hysterectomy for uteri >= 1 kg between January 2000 and December 2016. Patients with a preoperative diagnosis of uterine malignancy or suspected uterine malignancy were excluded. The subjects were divided according to the intended initial surgical approach (i.e., open or laparoscopic). The 2 groups were compared in terms of intraoperative data and postoperative outcomes. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify possible independent predictors of overall complications. A subanalysis including only obese women was accomplished.Interventions: Total laparoscopic versus abdominal hysterectomy (+/- bilateral adnexectomy).Measurements and Main Results: Intra-and postoperative surgical outcomes. A total of 258 patients were included; 55 (21.3%) women were initially approached by open surgery and 203 (78.7%) by laparoscopy. Nine (4.4%) conversions from laparoscopic to open surgery were registered. The median operative time was longer in the laparoscopic group (120 [range, 50-360] vs 85 [range, 35-240] minutes, p = .014). The estimated blood loss (150 [range, 0-1700] vs 200 [50-3000] mL, p = .04), postoperative hemoglobin drop, and hospital stay (1 [range, 1-8] vs 3 [range, 1-8] days, p < .001) were lower among patients operated by laparoscopy. No difference was found between groups in terms of intra-and postoperative complications. However, the overall rate of complications (10.8% vs. 27.2%, p = .015) and the incidence of significant complications (defined as intraoperative adverse events or postoperative Clavien-Dindo >= 2 events, 4.4% vs 10.9%, p = .04) were significantly higher among patients who initially received open surgery. The laparoscopic approach was found to be the only independent predictor of a lower incidence of overall complications (odds ratio = 0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.9). The overall morbidity of minimally invasive hysterectomy was lower also in the subanalysis concerning only obese patients.Conclusion: In experienced hands and in dedicated centers, laparoscopic hysterectomy for uteri weighing >= 1 kg is feasible and safe. Minimally invasive surgery retains its well-known advantages over open surgery even in patients with extremely enlarged uteri. (C) 2017 AAGL. All rights reserved.
2018
1 kg
Complications
Hysterectomy
Laparoscopy
Large uterus
Total laparoscopic hysterectomy
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1127030
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