Introduction: Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) is a widely prevalent and complex neurological disorder. Despite notable advancements in managing RLS, the disorder continues to face challenges related to its recognition and management. Objective: This study seeks to gain comprehensive insights into the knowledge and clinical practices among Italian neurologists regarding RLS diagnosis, management, and treatment, comparing approaches among general neurologists, movement disorder specialists, and sleep experts. Methods: Members of the Italian Society of Neurology, the Italian Society of Parkinson and Movement Disorders, and the Italian Association of Sleep Medicine were invited to participate in a 19-question online survey. Results: Among the 343 surveyed neurologists, 60% categorized RLS as a "sleep-related movement disorder." Forty% indicated managing 5-15 RLS patients annually, with sleep specialists handling the highest patient volume. Of note, only 34% adhered strictly to all five essential diagnostic criteria. The majority (69%) favored low-dosage dopamine agonists as their first-line treatment, with movement disorder specialists predominantly endorsing this approach, while sleep experts preferred iron supplementation. Regular screening for iron levels was widespread (91%), with supplementation typically guided by serum iron alterations. In cases of ineffective initial treatments, escalating dopamine agonist dosage was the preferred strategy (40%). Conclusions: These findings underscore a lack of a clear conceptualization of RLS, with a widespread misconception of the disorder as solely a movement disorder significantly influencing treatment approaches. Disparities in RLS understanding across neurology subspecialties underscore the necessity for improved diagnostic accuracy, targeted educational initiatives, and management guidelines to ensure consistent and effective RLS management.

A survey-based approach on restless legs syndrome: practices and perspectives among Italian neurologists

Antelmi, Elena
;
Mingolla, Gloria Pompea;Bonetto, Chiara;Tinazzi, Michele
2024-01-01

Abstract

Introduction: Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) is a widely prevalent and complex neurological disorder. Despite notable advancements in managing RLS, the disorder continues to face challenges related to its recognition and management. Objective: This study seeks to gain comprehensive insights into the knowledge and clinical practices among Italian neurologists regarding RLS diagnosis, management, and treatment, comparing approaches among general neurologists, movement disorder specialists, and sleep experts. Methods: Members of the Italian Society of Neurology, the Italian Society of Parkinson and Movement Disorders, and the Italian Association of Sleep Medicine were invited to participate in a 19-question online survey. Results: Among the 343 surveyed neurologists, 60% categorized RLS as a "sleep-related movement disorder." Forty% indicated managing 5-15 RLS patients annually, with sleep specialists handling the highest patient volume. Of note, only 34% adhered strictly to all five essential diagnostic criteria. The majority (69%) favored low-dosage dopamine agonists as their first-line treatment, with movement disorder specialists predominantly endorsing this approach, while sleep experts preferred iron supplementation. Regular screening for iron levels was widespread (91%), with supplementation typically guided by serum iron alterations. In cases of ineffective initial treatments, escalating dopamine agonist dosage was the preferred strategy (40%). Conclusions: These findings underscore a lack of a clear conceptualization of RLS, with a widespread misconception of the disorder as solely a movement disorder significantly influencing treatment approaches. Disparities in RLS understanding across neurology subspecialties underscore the necessity for improved diagnostic accuracy, targeted educational initiatives, and management guidelines to ensure consistent and effective RLS management.
2024
Education
Neurologists
Restless legs syndrome
Sensorimotor disorder
Survey
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1125555
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