: In the molecular era, proper archival conditions within pathology laboratories are crucial, especially for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens retrieved years after the original diagnosis. Indeed, improper preservation can impact the integrity of nucleic acids and protein antigens. This study evaluates the quality status of stored FFPE blocks using multilevel omics approaches. FFPE blocks from 45 Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC) cases were analyzed. The blocks were collected from six different pathology archives across Italy with distinct environmental characteristics. Nucleic acids' quantity and quality, as well as protein antigens, were assessed using various techniques, including MALDI-MSI. RNA was quantitatively higher, but more fragmented, compared to DNA. DNA quantity and quality were suitable for molecular analyses in 94.4% and 62.3% of samples, respectively. RNA quantity was adequate across all samples, but it was optimal only in 22.3% of cases. DNA quality started to deteriorate after 6-8 years, whereas RNA quality diminished only after 10 years of storage. These data might suggest a particular DNA susceptibility to FFPE blocks conservation. Immunohistochemical intensity decreased significantly after 6-8 years of storage, and MALDI-MSI analysis revealed that younger tissue blocks contained more unique proteomic signals than the older ones. This study emphasizes the importance of proper FFPE archiving conditions for molecular analyses. Governance should prioritize attention to pathology archives to ensure quality preservation and optimize predictive testing. By elucidating the nuances of FFPE block storage, this research paves the way for enhanced molecular diagnostics and therapeutic insights regarding oncology and beyond.

Pathology Laboratory Archives: Conservation Quality of Nucleic Acids and Proteins for NSCLC Molecular Testing

Eccher, Albino;Scarpa, Aldo;
2024-01-01

Abstract

: In the molecular era, proper archival conditions within pathology laboratories are crucial, especially for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens retrieved years after the original diagnosis. Indeed, improper preservation can impact the integrity of nucleic acids and protein antigens. This study evaluates the quality status of stored FFPE blocks using multilevel omics approaches. FFPE blocks from 45 Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC) cases were analyzed. The blocks were collected from six different pathology archives across Italy with distinct environmental characteristics. Nucleic acids' quantity and quality, as well as protein antigens, were assessed using various techniques, including MALDI-MSI. RNA was quantitatively higher, but more fragmented, compared to DNA. DNA quantity and quality were suitable for molecular analyses in 94.4% and 62.3% of samples, respectively. RNA quantity was adequate across all samples, but it was optimal only in 22.3% of cases. DNA quality started to deteriorate after 6-8 years, whereas RNA quality diminished only after 10 years of storage. These data might suggest a particular DNA susceptibility to FFPE blocks conservation. Immunohistochemical intensity decreased significantly after 6-8 years of storage, and MALDI-MSI analysis revealed that younger tissue blocks contained more unique proteomic signals than the older ones. This study emphasizes the importance of proper FFPE archiving conditions for molecular analyses. Governance should prioritize attention to pathology archives to ensure quality preservation and optimize predictive testing. By elucidating the nuances of FFPE block storage, this research paves the way for enhanced molecular diagnostics and therapeutic insights regarding oncology and beyond.
2024
FFPE blocks; NSCLC; conservation quality; pathology laboratory archive
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1125290
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