The aim of this study was to prospectively assess the development and trajectories of anxiety and depressive symptoms among subjects with different mental disorders, during the 3rd wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (T0, March-April 2021) while strict containment measures were applied in Italy, and after 3 months (T1, June-July 2021), with reduced restrictive measures. A sample of 527 subjects, with different DSM-5 diagnoses, was enrolled at nine Italian psychiatric outpatient services. Assessments at T0 and T1 included the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-Item (GAD-7) for anxiety symptoms, and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) for depressive symptoms. Differences in anxiety and depressive symptoms rates emerged across different mental disorders and a general improvement at T1 was detected for all of them in both the GAD-7 and PHQ-9 scores, except for Psychosis and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Patients with Feeding and Eating Disorders (FED) reported statistically significantly higher: GAD-7 scores than those with Bipolar Disorder (BD), at both times, and Anxiety Disorders at baseline; PHQ-9 scores than all other diagnostic categories, at both times. Unemployment, no COVID-19 infection, OCD were predictive variables related to GAD-7 scores at T1, while being unmarried, BD or FED related to PHQ-9 scores at T1. Subjects with mental disorders reported anxiety and depressive symptoms during the third pandemic wave and most of patients showed an improvement over a 3-month follow-up, despite differences emerged among diagnostic categories and for the variables involved. Further studies are needed to deepen knowledge on pandemic impact on patients with mental disorders.

Longitudinal trajectories of anxiety and depression in subjects with different mental disorders after one year in the COVID-19 pandemic

Tosato, Sarah;
2024-01-01

Abstract

The aim of this study was to prospectively assess the development and trajectories of anxiety and depressive symptoms among subjects with different mental disorders, during the 3rd wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (T0, March-April 2021) while strict containment measures were applied in Italy, and after 3 months (T1, June-July 2021), with reduced restrictive measures. A sample of 527 subjects, with different DSM-5 diagnoses, was enrolled at nine Italian psychiatric outpatient services. Assessments at T0 and T1 included the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-Item (GAD-7) for anxiety symptoms, and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) for depressive symptoms. Differences in anxiety and depressive symptoms rates emerged across different mental disorders and a general improvement at T1 was detected for all of them in both the GAD-7 and PHQ-9 scores, except for Psychosis and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Patients with Feeding and Eating Disorders (FED) reported statistically significantly higher: GAD-7 scores than those with Bipolar Disorder (BD), at both times, and Anxiety Disorders at baseline; PHQ-9 scores than all other diagnostic categories, at both times. Unemployment, no COVID-19 infection, OCD were predictive variables related to GAD-7 scores at T1, while being unmarried, BD or FED related to PHQ-9 scores at T1. Subjects with mental disorders reported anxiety and depressive symptoms during the third pandemic wave and most of patients showed an improvement over a 3-month follow-up, despite differences emerged among diagnostic categories and for the variables involved. Further studies are needed to deepen knowledge on pandemic impact on patients with mental disorders.
2024
Anxiety
Feeding and eating disorders
Mental disorders
OCD
Obsessive compulsive disorder
Psychosis
Sars-Cov-2
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1119573
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact