Background: Feasibility of exercise in patients with metastatic cancer is still a challenge. This study aimed to determine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an exercise intervention based on a patient-preferred delivery mode in patients affected by metastatic cancer. Materials and methods: Forty-four patients with a confirmed diagnosis of metastatic cancer were recruited in a 3-month exercise program. Whereas the exercise program consisted of aerobic and resistance activities performed twice a week, the participants may choose the mode of delivery: home based, personal training, or group based. The primary endpoint was the feasibility, defined by recruitment rate, attendance, adherence, dropout rate, tolerability (comparing the session RPE with the target RPE), and safety (using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 5.0). Secondary endpoints included cardiorespiratory fitness (six minutes walking test), muscle strength (handgrip strength test and isometric leg press test), flexibility (the back scratch and chair sit and reach tests), anthropometric parameters (body mass index and waist-hip ratio), quality of life (EORTC QLQ C-30 questionnaire), and amount of physical exercise (Godin's Shepard Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire). Descriptive statistics, Student t test, and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to analyze data. Results: The study recruitment rate was 81%. Out of 44 recruited patients, 28 chose the personal training program, 16 chose the home-based program, and none chose the group-based program. Nine dropouts occurred (20%), 6 in the personal training program, and 3 in the home-based intervention. The median attendance rate was 92%, adherence was 88%, tolerability was 100%, and 9 nonsevere adverse events were registered during the exercise sessions. An increase in cardiorespiratory fitness (P < .001) and flexibility (P = .011 for chair sit and reach; P = .040 for back scratch) was observed at the end of the intervention, while no changes in anthropometric values and muscle strength were detected. Different quality-of-life domains were improved following the intervention, including physical (P = .002), emotional (P < .001), and role functioning (P = .018), fatigue (P = .030), and appetite loss (P = .005). Conclusion: A 3-month exercise program based on a patient-preferred delivery mode is feasible in patients with metastatic cancer and may improve physical function and quality of life. Trial registration: NCT04226508.

A Feasibility Study Investigating an Exercise Program in Metastatic Cancer Based on the Patient-Preferred Delivery Mode

Avancini, Alice;Borsati, Anita;Baldo, Elisabetta;Ciurnelli, Christian;Trestini, Ilaria;Tregnago, Daniela;Belluomini, Lorenzo;Sposito, Marco;Insolda, Jessica;Auriemma, Alessandra;Fiorio, Elena;Piacentini, Michela;Schena, Federico;Milella, Michele;Pilotto, Sara
2024-01-01

Abstract

Background: Feasibility of exercise in patients with metastatic cancer is still a challenge. This study aimed to determine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an exercise intervention based on a patient-preferred delivery mode in patients affected by metastatic cancer. Materials and methods: Forty-four patients with a confirmed diagnosis of metastatic cancer were recruited in a 3-month exercise program. Whereas the exercise program consisted of aerobic and resistance activities performed twice a week, the participants may choose the mode of delivery: home based, personal training, or group based. The primary endpoint was the feasibility, defined by recruitment rate, attendance, adherence, dropout rate, tolerability (comparing the session RPE with the target RPE), and safety (using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 5.0). Secondary endpoints included cardiorespiratory fitness (six minutes walking test), muscle strength (handgrip strength test and isometric leg press test), flexibility (the back scratch and chair sit and reach tests), anthropometric parameters (body mass index and waist-hip ratio), quality of life (EORTC QLQ C-30 questionnaire), and amount of physical exercise (Godin's Shepard Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire). Descriptive statistics, Student t test, and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to analyze data. Results: The study recruitment rate was 81%. Out of 44 recruited patients, 28 chose the personal training program, 16 chose the home-based program, and none chose the group-based program. Nine dropouts occurred (20%), 6 in the personal training program, and 3 in the home-based intervention. The median attendance rate was 92%, adherence was 88%, tolerability was 100%, and 9 nonsevere adverse events were registered during the exercise sessions. An increase in cardiorespiratory fitness (P < .001) and flexibility (P = .011 for chair sit and reach; P = .040 for back scratch) was observed at the end of the intervention, while no changes in anthropometric values and muscle strength were detected. Different quality-of-life domains were improved following the intervention, including physical (P = .002), emotional (P < .001), and role functioning (P = .018), fatigue (P = .030), and appetite loss (P = .005). Conclusion: A 3-month exercise program based on a patient-preferred delivery mode is feasible in patients with metastatic cancer and may improve physical function and quality of life. Trial registration: NCT04226508.
2024
exercise
feasibility
metastatic cancer
patient’s preferences
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1117128
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