Background: Workplace violence (WPV) is a growing issue in health care with far-reaching consequences for health workers’ physical and psychological well-being. While some medical specialities like emergency medicine have always been considered at higher risk for WPV, several studies have also reported its occurrence in radiology. Aims: This systematic review aimed to comprehensively synthesize the types of WPV in radiology, its psychological impact, and the underlying risk and protective factors. Methods: We searched five electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science Core Collection, Scopus, PsycINFO and CINAHL) and additional literature, including grey literature, and established weekly search alerts. Two reviewers independently conducted all methodological steps, involving a third reviewer in case of disagreement. Results: Of the 12 205 retrieved records, 103 full-text articles were evaluated, and 15 studies were included. Across studies, verbal aggression, sexual harassment (mostly against women) and physical violence were experienced by up to 100%, 85% and 46% of health workers, respectively. Perpetrators were patients and patients’ caregivers, followed by co-workers. Victims suffered from various psychological symptoms, such as anxiety (22%–54%), fear (6%–39%), depression (32%) and repeated disturbing memories (21%). Risk factors included female gender, understaffing, worker inexperience, poor communication and lengthy waiting times. Social support and security personnel presence were among the identified protective factors. Conclusions: Health workers are at high risk of experiencing WPV in the radiological setting, with a strong psychological impact. Radiological departments should create a safe healthcare environment that actively manages the identified risk factors and offers psychological support to affected workers.

Workplace violence in radiology: results of a systematic review

Isolde Martina Busch
;
Michela Rimondini;Francesca Moretti;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Background: Workplace violence (WPV) is a growing issue in health care with far-reaching consequences for health workers’ physical and psychological well-being. While some medical specialities like emergency medicine have always been considered at higher risk for WPV, several studies have also reported its occurrence in radiology. Aims: This systematic review aimed to comprehensively synthesize the types of WPV in radiology, its psychological impact, and the underlying risk and protective factors. Methods: We searched five electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science Core Collection, Scopus, PsycINFO and CINAHL) and additional literature, including grey literature, and established weekly search alerts. Two reviewers independently conducted all methodological steps, involving a third reviewer in case of disagreement. Results: Of the 12 205 retrieved records, 103 full-text articles were evaluated, and 15 studies were included. Across studies, verbal aggression, sexual harassment (mostly against women) and physical violence were experienced by up to 100%, 85% and 46% of health workers, respectively. Perpetrators were patients and patients’ caregivers, followed by co-workers. Victims suffered from various psychological symptoms, such as anxiety (22%–54%), fear (6%–39%), depression (32%) and repeated disturbing memories (21%). Risk factors included female gender, understaffing, worker inexperience, poor communication and lengthy waiting times. Social support and security personnel presence were among the identified protective factors. Conclusions: Health workers are at high risk of experiencing WPV in the radiological setting, with a strong psychological impact. Radiological departments should create a safe healthcare environment that actively manages the identified risk factors and offers psychological support to affected workers.
2023
workplace violence
radiology
mental health
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1115207
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