Introduction and objective: To evaluate the immediate impact of robotic human cadaver training on the confidence with robotic surgery among urology residents. Methods: After a preliminary survey assessing baseline skills, our institution's urology residents attended a single session of robotic training on fresh-frozen human cadavers, supervised by staff urologists. Post-training, both the residents and the supervisors were administered a survey querying the improvement of robotic skills and the sentiments toward the cadaver laboratory compared with alternative trainings (answers were given by Likert scale: 1 = negative/5 = positive). Results: Twenty-two residents and five supervisors completed the surveys. Median residents' age was 32 years (IQR 29-33). Median year of residency was 4 (IQR 3-6). One hundred percent of the residents were familiar with robotics (86.4% had previous experience as bedside assistant; 90.9% have performed a median of 15 procedures at console). Post-training the residents evaluated their confidence with port placement and docking, EndoWrist® manipulation, Camera and Clutching, Fourth Arm Integration, and Needle Control and Driving with median scores of 4 (IQR 4-5), 4 (IQR 4-5), 4 (IQR 4-5), 4 (IQR 4-4), and 4 (IQR 3-4), with significant perceived improvement in all skills (P < .045). Almost all of them (86.4%) rated the cadaver training 5. When asked about the superiority of human cadaver training with respect to the virtual simulator and the pig laboratory, residents gave median scores of 5 (IQR 5-5) and 4 (IQR 3-5). At univariate analysis, increased experience with robotics was found to be inversely associated with improvement in the "camera and clutching" skill (P < .048). The supervisors felt that human cadaver training was effective in improving the residents' robotic skills (median answer of 5, IQR 4-5). Conclusions: Human cadaver robotic training demonstrated great acceptability among both the residents and the supervisors. It allowed for immediate improvement of the residents' robotic skills.

Single Session of Robotic Human Cadaver Training: The Immediate Impact on Urology Residents in a Teaching Hospital

Bertolo R.;
2018-01-01

Abstract

Introduction and objective: To evaluate the immediate impact of robotic human cadaver training on the confidence with robotic surgery among urology residents. Methods: After a preliminary survey assessing baseline skills, our institution's urology residents attended a single session of robotic training on fresh-frozen human cadavers, supervised by staff urologists. Post-training, both the residents and the supervisors were administered a survey querying the improvement of robotic skills and the sentiments toward the cadaver laboratory compared with alternative trainings (answers were given by Likert scale: 1 = negative/5 = positive). Results: Twenty-two residents and five supervisors completed the surveys. Median residents' age was 32 years (IQR 29-33). Median year of residency was 4 (IQR 3-6). One hundred percent of the residents were familiar with robotics (86.4% had previous experience as bedside assistant; 90.9% have performed a median of 15 procedures at console). Post-training the residents evaluated their confidence with port placement and docking, EndoWrist® manipulation, Camera and Clutching, Fourth Arm Integration, and Needle Control and Driving with median scores of 4 (IQR 4-5), 4 (IQR 4-5), 4 (IQR 4-5), 4 (IQR 4-4), and 4 (IQR 3-4), with significant perceived improvement in all skills (P < .045). Almost all of them (86.4%) rated the cadaver training 5. When asked about the superiority of human cadaver training with respect to the virtual simulator and the pig laboratory, residents gave median scores of 5 (IQR 5-5) and 4 (IQR 3-5). At univariate analysis, increased experience with robotics was found to be inversely associated with improvement in the "camera and clutching" skill (P < .048). The supervisors felt that human cadaver training was effective in improving the residents' robotic skills (median answer of 5, IQR 4-5). Conclusions: Human cadaver robotic training demonstrated great acceptability among both the residents and the supervisors. It allowed for immediate improvement of the residents' robotic skills.
2018
cadaver
robot
simulation
skills
surgery
Training
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1112237
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