The application of biochar to soils, either alone or combined with other amendments, represents a management practice aimed at storing carbon (C) while enhancing soil fertility. However, the long-term effects of biochar application on soil organic C protection against microbial decomposition are uncertain. This study investigated, in a 9-year-long-term field experiment, the protection of organic C by minerals and iron (Fe) in soils amended with biochar alone or combined with either municipal solid waste compost or sewage sludge. Particulate (not protected by minerals) and mineral-associated organic matter fractions were separated, quantified, and finally the Fe-mediated protection mechanisms were examined by Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. With respect to the unamended control soil, soils amended with biochar, especially when combined with municipal solid waste compost and sewage sludge, had 3 times greater content of particulate organic C. Biochar combined with municipal solid waste compost and sewage sludge also increased mineral-associated organic C content (1.5×), although the magnitude of the effect was smaller than for the particulate organic C fraction. The contents of Fe(III)-organic matter complexes in particulate and mineral-associated organic matter fractions of the amended soils were similar to those of the unamended soils. Hematite represented the main Fe oxide phase in the particulate organic matter fraction of all the soils as well as in the mineral-associated organic matter fraction of the unamended soils, whereas ferrihydrite was more abundant in the mineral-associated organic matter fraction of the amended soils. As a whole, the obtained results in general, and the positive effect on the mineral-associated organic matter possibly mediated by ferrihydrite occurrence in particular, highlight the potential of biochar, alone or in combination with other amendments, as a strategy to store and preserve C in soils.

Distribution of soil organic carbon between particulate and mineral-associated fractions as affected by biochar and its co-application with other amendments

Giannetta, Beatrice
;
Galluzzi, Giorgio;Zaccone, Claudio
2024-01-01

Abstract

The application of biochar to soils, either alone or combined with other amendments, represents a management practice aimed at storing carbon (C) while enhancing soil fertility. However, the long-term effects of biochar application on soil organic C protection against microbial decomposition are uncertain. This study investigated, in a 9-year-long-term field experiment, the protection of organic C by minerals and iron (Fe) in soils amended with biochar alone or combined with either municipal solid waste compost or sewage sludge. Particulate (not protected by minerals) and mineral-associated organic matter fractions were separated, quantified, and finally the Fe-mediated protection mechanisms were examined by Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. With respect to the unamended control soil, soils amended with biochar, especially when combined with municipal solid waste compost and sewage sludge, had 3 times greater content of particulate organic C. Biochar combined with municipal solid waste compost and sewage sludge also increased mineral-associated organic C content (1.5×), although the magnitude of the effect was smaller than for the particulate organic C fraction. The contents of Fe(III)-organic matter complexes in particulate and mineral-associated organic matter fractions of the amended soils were similar to those of the unamended soils. Hematite represented the main Fe oxide phase in the particulate organic matter fraction of all the soils as well as in the mineral-associated organic matter fraction of the unamended soils, whereas ferrihydrite was more abundant in the mineral-associated organic matter fraction of the amended soils. As a whole, the obtained results in general, and the positive effect on the mineral-associated organic matter possibly mediated by ferrihydrite occurrence in particular, highlight the potential of biochar, alone or in combination with other amendments, as a strategy to store and preserve C in soils.
2024
Long-term experiment, Iron oxides, Organo-mineral interactions, Physical fractionation, EXAFS, Compost
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1110866
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