Lifestyle modifications (i.e., nutrition and physical activity) remain the main tools in the context of childhood obesity's treatment and prevention of short and long-term consequences. At the same time, parental perception of child weight represents an even more important tool. It is known that more than half of parents of overweight/obese children underestimate their child's weight status or are not worried about the risks associated with childhood overweight/obesity. Consequently, parental perception of childhood obesity can often be erroneous, and, even when accurate, subsequent parental behaviors can inadvertently contribute to the onset or persistence of childhood and adult obesity. Starting from the evidence that targeting a parent to induce a behavioral change is more effective than targeting the child only without parental participation, parental perceptions of childhood obesity can therefore represent a very important tool to take into consideration to achieve improvements in the context of childhood obesity. Therefore, knowledge of parental perception of children's weight status is needed to help pediatricians to organize and adapt activities and programs that promote healthy weight management among children. Specifically, early assessments of parents' perceptions of a child's weight, followed by regular follow-up visits, appropriate feedback, continuing education efforts, and efforts to follow the child's weight status over time, can be potentially very helpful.

Parental Perceptions and Concerns Related to the Consequences of Pediatric Obesity: Feeling or Real Problem?

Luca Pecoraro;Luca Dalle Carbonare;Giorgio Piacentini;Angelo Pietrobelli
2023-01-01

Abstract

Lifestyle modifications (i.e., nutrition and physical activity) remain the main tools in the context of childhood obesity's treatment and prevention of short and long-term consequences. At the same time, parental perception of child weight represents an even more important tool. It is known that more than half of parents of overweight/obese children underestimate their child's weight status or are not worried about the risks associated with childhood overweight/obesity. Consequently, parental perception of childhood obesity can often be erroneous, and, even when accurate, subsequent parental behaviors can inadvertently contribute to the onset or persistence of childhood and adult obesity. Starting from the evidence that targeting a parent to induce a behavioral change is more effective than targeting the child only without parental participation, parental perceptions of childhood obesity can therefore represent a very important tool to take into consideration to achieve improvements in the context of childhood obesity. Therefore, knowledge of parental perception of children's weight status is needed to help pediatricians to organize and adapt activities and programs that promote healthy weight management among children. Specifically, early assessments of parents' perceptions of a child's weight, followed by regular follow-up visits, appropriate feedback, continuing education efforts, and efforts to follow the child's weight status over time, can be potentially very helpful.
2023
BMI
Pediatric obesity
cardiovascular diseases
childhood obesity
diabetes
long-term consequences of pediatric-obesity
parental perceptions of pediatric obesity
short-term consequences of pediatric obesity
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1106446
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