Background and purpose: To determine the incidence of acute neuroimaging (NI) findings and comorbidities in the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19)-infected subjects in seven U.S. and four European hospitals. Methods: This is a retrospective study of COVID-19-positive subjects with the following inclusion criteria: age >18, lab-confirmed COVID-19 infection, and acute NI findings (NI+) attributed to COVID-19 on CT or MRI brain. NI+ and comorbidities in total hospitalized COVID-19-positive (TN) subjects were assessed. Results: A total of 37,950 COVID-19-positive subjects were reviewed and 4342 underwent NI. NI+ incidence in subjects with NI was 10.1% (442/4342) including 7.9% (294/3701) in the United States and 22.8% (148/647) in Europe. NI+ incidence in TN was 1.16% (442/37,950). In NI (4342), incidence of ischemic stroke was 6.4% followed by intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) (3.8%), encephalitis (0.5%), sinus venous thrombosis (0.2%), and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) (0.2%). White matter involvement was seen in 57% of NI+. Hypertension was the most common comorbidity (54%) before cardiac disease (28.8%) and diabetes mellitus (27.7%). Cardiac disease (p < .025), diabetes (p < .014), and chronic kidney disease (p < .012) were more common in the United States. Conclusion: This multicenter, multinational study investigated the incidence and spectrum of NI+ in 37,950 hospitalized adult COVID-19 subjects including regional differences in incidences of NI+, associated comorbidities, and other demographics. NI+ incidence in TN was 1.16% including 0.95% in the United States and 2.09% in Europe. ICH, encephalitis, and ADEM were common in Europe, while ischemic strokes were more common in the United States. In this cohort, incidence and distribution of NI+ helped characterize the neurological complications of COVID-19.

Neuroimaging findings in 4342 hospitalized COVID-19 subjects: A multicenter report from the United States and Europe

Mansueto, Giancarlo;Pizzini, Francesca
2023-01-01

Abstract

Background and purpose: To determine the incidence of acute neuroimaging (NI) findings and comorbidities in the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19)-infected subjects in seven U.S. and four European hospitals. Methods: This is a retrospective study of COVID-19-positive subjects with the following inclusion criteria: age >18, lab-confirmed COVID-19 infection, and acute NI findings (NI+) attributed to COVID-19 on CT or MRI brain. NI+ and comorbidities in total hospitalized COVID-19-positive (TN) subjects were assessed. Results: A total of 37,950 COVID-19-positive subjects were reviewed and 4342 underwent NI. NI+ incidence in subjects with NI was 10.1% (442/4342) including 7.9% (294/3701) in the United States and 22.8% (148/647) in Europe. NI+ incidence in TN was 1.16% (442/37,950). In NI (4342), incidence of ischemic stroke was 6.4% followed by intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) (3.8%), encephalitis (0.5%), sinus venous thrombosis (0.2%), and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) (0.2%). White matter involvement was seen in 57% of NI+. Hypertension was the most common comorbidity (54%) before cardiac disease (28.8%) and diabetes mellitus (27.7%). Cardiac disease (p < .025), diabetes (p < .014), and chronic kidney disease (p < .012) were more common in the United States. Conclusion: This multicenter, multinational study investigated the incidence and spectrum of NI+ in 37,950 hospitalized adult COVID-19 subjects including regional differences in incidences of NI+, associated comorbidities, and other demographics. NI+ incidence in TN was 1.16% including 0.95% in the United States and 2.09% in Europe. ICH, encephalitis, and ADEM were common in Europe, while ischemic strokes were more common in the United States. In this cohort, incidence and distribution of NI+ helped characterize the neurological complications of COVID-19.
2023
COVID-19; brain; neuroimaging
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1098066
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