PurposeTo explore the association between patient-centered communication, patients' satisfaction, and retention in care in assisted reproductive technology (ART) visits.MethodsART visits at eight Italian clinics were videotaped and coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System, which includes a Patient-Centered Index (PCI), a summary patient-centered communication ratio. After the visit, patients completed a satisfaction questionnaire (SATQ). After 3months, patients were asked about their retention in care. Spearman correlations and Mann-Whitney tests were used to test associations between the study variables; the open-ended item of SATQ was analyzed through content analysis.ResultsEighty-five visits were videotaped (involving 28 gynecologists and 160 patients). PCI score (=0.510.28) revealed a more disease-oriented communication during the visit. Patients reported high levels of satisfaction with the visit and identified in the information provision or in the doctor's humanity or kindness the main reasons of satisfaction. At the follow-up, the majority of the couples declared to have followed the clinicians' recommendations and to have remained related to the ART center. No associations were found among the study variables, except for a lower male satisfaction among couples who declared to have changed ART clinic.Conclusions Contrary to what was expected, the style of physician-patient communication was not found to be associated with patient satisfaction and retention in care. However, patients were highly satisfied and engaged. The actual meaning of a communication that is patient-centered in the ART context might be wider, including the couples' need for information, as suggested by qualitative findings.

Patient-centered communication, patient satisfaction, and retention in care in assisted reproductive technology visits

D. Leone;S. Poli;G. Giuffrida;R. Palermo;G. Tomasi;F. Tomei;
2019-01-01

Abstract

PurposeTo explore the association between patient-centered communication, patients' satisfaction, and retention in care in assisted reproductive technology (ART) visits.MethodsART visits at eight Italian clinics were videotaped and coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System, which includes a Patient-Centered Index (PCI), a summary patient-centered communication ratio. After the visit, patients completed a satisfaction questionnaire (SATQ). After 3months, patients were asked about their retention in care. Spearman correlations and Mann-Whitney tests were used to test associations between the study variables; the open-ended item of SATQ was analyzed through content analysis.ResultsEighty-five visits were videotaped (involving 28 gynecologists and 160 patients). PCI score (=0.510.28) revealed a more disease-oriented communication during the visit. Patients reported high levels of satisfaction with the visit and identified in the information provision or in the doctor's humanity or kindness the main reasons of satisfaction. At the follow-up, the majority of the couples declared to have followed the clinicians' recommendations and to have remained related to the ART center. No associations were found among the study variables, except for a lower male satisfaction among couples who declared to have changed ART clinic.Conclusions Contrary to what was expected, the style of physician-patient communication was not found to be associated with patient satisfaction and retention in care. However, patients were highly satisfied and engaged. The actual meaning of a communication that is patient-centered in the ART context might be wider, including the couples' need for information, as suggested by qualitative findings.
2019
Assisted reproductive technology
Doctor-patient interaction
Patient-centered communication
RIAS
Retention in care
Satisfaction
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1083327
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