The SARS-CoV-2 infection is characterized by both systemic and organ hyper-thromboinflammation, with a clinical course ranging from mild up-to critical systemic dysfunction and death. In patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) the monocyte/macrophage population is deeply involved as both trigger and target, assuming the value of useful diagnostic/prognostic marker of innate cellular immunity. Several studies correlated morphological and immunophenotypic alterations of circulating monocytes with clinical outcomes in COVID-19 patients, concluding that monocyte distribution width (MDW) may retain clinical value in stratifying the risk of disease worsening. Through an electronic search in Medline and Scopus we performed an updated literature review and meta-analysis aimed to explore the association between increased MDW levels and illness severity in COVID-19 patients, deciphering role(s) and function(s) of monocytes in the harmful network underlining SARS-CoV-2 infection. We found that significantly elevated MDW values were frequently present in COVID-19 patients who developed unfavorable clinical outcomes, compounded by a significant association between monocyte anisocytosis and SARS-CoV-2 outcomes. These findings suggest that blood MDW index and its scatter plot could represent useful routine laboratory tools for early identification of patients at higher risk of unfavorable COVID-19 and for monitoring the progression of viral infection, clinical outcomes, and therapeutic efficacy throughout hospitalization. According to this evidence, therapeutic decisions in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection could benefit from monitoring MDW value, with administration of drugs limiting thrombo-inflammation due to monocyte hyper-activation in patients with severe/critical COVID-19 disease.

Deciphering the role of monocyte and monocyte distribution width (MDW) in COVID-19: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis

Lippi, Giuseppe;
In corso di stampa

Abstract

The SARS-CoV-2 infection is characterized by both systemic and organ hyper-thromboinflammation, with a clinical course ranging from mild up-to critical systemic dysfunction and death. In patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) the monocyte/macrophage population is deeply involved as both trigger and target, assuming the value of useful diagnostic/prognostic marker of innate cellular immunity. Several studies correlated morphological and immunophenotypic alterations of circulating monocytes with clinical outcomes in COVID-19 patients, concluding that monocyte distribution width (MDW) may retain clinical value in stratifying the risk of disease worsening. Through an electronic search in Medline and Scopus we performed an updated literature review and meta-analysis aimed to explore the association between increased MDW levels and illness severity in COVID-19 patients, deciphering role(s) and function(s) of monocytes in the harmful network underlining SARS-CoV-2 infection. We found that significantly elevated MDW values were frequently present in COVID-19 patients who developed unfavorable clinical outcomes, compounded by a significant association between monocyte anisocytosis and SARS-CoV-2 outcomes. These findings suggest that blood MDW index and its scatter plot could represent useful routine laboratory tools for early identification of patients at higher risk of unfavorable COVID-19 and for monitoring the progression of viral infection, clinical outcomes, and therapeutic efficacy throughout hospitalization. According to this evidence, therapeutic decisions in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection could benefit from monitoring MDW value, with administration of drugs limiting thrombo-inflammation due to monocyte hyper-activation in patients with severe/critical COVID-19 disease.
COVID-19, NETosis, NETs, SARS-CoV-2, citrullinated histone, heparins and heparinoids, histone, systematic review, thrombo-inflammation
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1082167
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