Loss of CDH1/Cadherin-1 is a common step towards the acquisition of an abnormal epithelial phenotype. In gastric cancer (GC), mutation and/or downregulation of CDH1/Cadherin-1 is recurrent in sporadic and hereditary diffuse GC type. To approach the molecular events downstream of CDH1/Cadherin-1 alterations and their relevance in gastric carcinogenesis, we queried public databases for genetic and DNA methylation data in search of molecular signatures with a still-uncertain role in the pathological mechanism of GC. In all GC subtypes, modulated genes correlating with CDH1/Cadherin-1 aberrations are associated with stem cell and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition pathways. A higher level of genes upregulated in CDH1-mutated GC cases is associated with reduced overall survival. In the diffuse GC (DGC) subtype, genes downregulated in CDH1-mutated compared to cases with wild type CDH1/Cadherin-1 resulted in being strongly intertwined with the DREAM complex. The inverse correlation between hypermethylated CpGs and CDH1/Cadherin-1 transcription in diverse subtypes implies a common epigenetic program. We identified nonredundant protein-encoding isoforms of 22 genes among those differentially expressed in GC compared to normal stomach. These unique proteins represent potential agents involved in cell transformation and candidate therapeutic targets. Meanwhile, drug-induced and CDH1/Cadherin-1 mutation-related gene expression comparison predicts FIT, GR-127935 hydrochloride, amiodarone hydrochloride in GC and BRD-K55722623, BRD-K13169950, and AY 9944 in DGC as the most effective treatments, providing cues for the design of combined pharmacological treatments. By integrating genetic and epigenetic aspects with their expected functional outcome, we unveiled promising targets for combinatorial pharmacological treatments of GC.

Landscape of Druggable Molecular Pathways Downstream of Genomic CDH1/Cadherin-1 Alterations in Gastric Cancer

Malpeli, Giorgio
;
Barbi, Stefano;Innamorati, Giulio;Alloggio, Mariella;Filippini, Federica;Decimo, Ilaria;Castelli, Claudia;Bencivenga, Maria
2022-01-01

Abstract

Loss of CDH1/Cadherin-1 is a common step towards the acquisition of an abnormal epithelial phenotype. In gastric cancer (GC), mutation and/or downregulation of CDH1/Cadherin-1 is recurrent in sporadic and hereditary diffuse GC type. To approach the molecular events downstream of CDH1/Cadherin-1 alterations and their relevance in gastric carcinogenesis, we queried public databases for genetic and DNA methylation data in search of molecular signatures with a still-uncertain role in the pathological mechanism of GC. In all GC subtypes, modulated genes correlating with CDH1/Cadherin-1 aberrations are associated with stem cell and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition pathways. A higher level of genes upregulated in CDH1-mutated GC cases is associated with reduced overall survival. In the diffuse GC (DGC) subtype, genes downregulated in CDH1-mutated compared to cases with wild type CDH1/Cadherin-1 resulted in being strongly intertwined with the DREAM complex. The inverse correlation between hypermethylated CpGs and CDH1/Cadherin-1 transcription in diverse subtypes implies a common epigenetic program. We identified nonredundant protein-encoding isoforms of 22 genes among those differentially expressed in GC compared to normal stomach. These unique proteins represent potential agents involved in cell transformation and candidate therapeutic targets. Meanwhile, drug-induced and CDH1/Cadherin-1 mutation-related gene expression comparison predicts FIT, GR-127935 hydrochloride, amiodarone hydrochloride in GC and BRD-K55722623, BRD-K13169950, and AY 9944 in DGC as the most effective treatments, providing cues for the design of combined pharmacological treatments. By integrating genetic and epigenetic aspects with their expected functional outcome, we unveiled promising targets for combinatorial pharmacological treatments of GC.
CDH1; E-cadherin; biomarkers; diffuse gastric cancer; gastric cancer; pharmacological therapy
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1082051
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