A genotyping assay was used to define human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase codons in plasma samples from 80 HIV-1 patients extensively treated with two nucleoside reverse transcriptase (zidovudine and lamivudine) and one non nucleoside reverse transcriptase (nevirapine) inhibitor. The frequencies of T215S/Y/F, M41L, D67N, L210W K70R, K219Q mutations, detectable in plasma samples, conferring resistance to zidovudine were 61.2, 56.2, 36.2, 31.5, 27.5 and 17.5%, respectively. Mutations (M184V or M184I) conferring resistance to lamivudine were detected in an extremely high percentage of patients (61%). Among mutations correlated to high (K103N, V106A, Y181C/I, Y188C/H/L, G190A/C/E/Q/S/T) or moderate (V108I, V118I) levels of nevirapine resistance, the predominant amino acid change was a substitution at 103 codon, present in 24 of 80 samples tested. Finally Q151M, the marker mutation able to confer resistance to all nucleoside analogues, was detected in seven patients with a viral load of between 1 x 10(4) and 9 x 10(4) HIV-1 RNA copies/ml. The relationship between the genotype and the viral load showed that the incidence of some specific mutations [M41L, T215Y (correlated to zidovudine resistance) and K103N (correlated to all NNRTIs drugs)] significantly (P=0.001) increased with higher viral load. Our results, albeit limited to a small cohort, showed a high frequency of mutations correlated to drugs in use, suggesting a need for therapeutic change in the near future and demonstrating that the development of genotyping tests helps to guide the therapeutic management of HIV-1 infected people. Our data highlight the dangers of selecting antiretroviral therapy without previous antiretroviral drug testing. Although the cost of these assays is a concern, prescribing inefficacious drugs could create serious problems for HIV-1 patients.

Mutation patterns of the reverse transcriptase genes in HIV-1 infected patients receiving combinations of nucleoside and non nucleoside inhibitors

D Gibellini;
2003

Abstract

A genotyping assay was used to define human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase codons in plasma samples from 80 HIV-1 patients extensively treated with two nucleoside reverse transcriptase (zidovudine and lamivudine) and one non nucleoside reverse transcriptase (nevirapine) inhibitor. The frequencies of T215S/Y/F, M41L, D67N, L210W K70R, K219Q mutations, detectable in plasma samples, conferring resistance to zidovudine were 61.2, 56.2, 36.2, 31.5, 27.5 and 17.5%, respectively. Mutations (M184V or M184I) conferring resistance to lamivudine were detected in an extremely high percentage of patients (61%). Among mutations correlated to high (K103N, V106A, Y181C/I, Y188C/H/L, G190A/C/E/Q/S/T) or moderate (V108I, V118I) levels of nevirapine resistance, the predominant amino acid change was a substitution at 103 codon, present in 24 of 80 samples tested. Finally Q151M, the marker mutation able to confer resistance to all nucleoside analogues, was detected in seven patients with a viral load of between 1 x 10(4) and 9 x 10(4) HIV-1 RNA copies/ml. The relationship between the genotype and the viral load showed that the incidence of some specific mutations [M41L, T215Y (correlated to zidovudine resistance) and K103N (correlated to all NNRTIs drugs)] significantly (P=0.001) increased with higher viral load. Our results, albeit limited to a small cohort, showed a high frequency of mutations correlated to drugs in use, suggesting a need for therapeutic change in the near future and demonstrating that the development of genotyping tests helps to guide the therapeutic management of HIV-1 infected people. Our data highlight the dangers of selecting antiretroviral therapy without previous antiretroviral drug testing. Although the cost of these assays is a concern, prescribing inefficacious drugs could create serious problems for HIV-1 patients.
HIV-1, nucleoside and non nucleoside inhibitors, mutation
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1078869
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