Background The number of shoulder arthroscopies is steadily increasing to treat glenohumeral joint disorders, among which the rotator cuff tear is the most common. The prevalence of this condition ranges from 13% to 37% in the general population without considering the number of asymptomatic patients. The gold standard procedure for rotator cuff repair is still undefined. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a population who underwent a single row (SR) rotator cuff repair and correlate their clinical results with MRI findings. Materials and methods Sixty-seven consecutive rotator cuff procedures were retrospectively selected. All patients were diagnosed with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear and subsequently treated with an arthroscopic SR repair technique. Each patient was clinically assessed with the DASH questionnaire and the Constant-Murley Score to grade their satisfaction. Moreover, rotator cuff repair integrity was evaluated by MRI and graded using the Sugaya score. Results Mean follow-up was 19.5 +/- 5.7 months. The mean Constant score was 82.8 +/- 13.0 points, with 55 patients reporting excellent results. No patient scored less than 30 points, which could be deemed as unsatisfying. Meanwhile, on the DASH questionnaire, 6.1% of our patients rated their clinical outcome as unsatisfying, whereas 75.8% rated their outcome as excellent. Postoperative MRI classified 45 patients (83.3%) as either Sugaya type I, II, or III, whereas 9 patients (16.7%) presented a Sugaya type IV consistent with a full-thickness cuff retear. Of these nine patients, five (55.6%) and three (33.3%) reported excellent results for the Constant score and DASH questionnaire, respectively. The Mann-Whitney test reported that the retear group had worse scores than the intact repaired cuff group for pain (8.3 +/- 5.0 versus 13.1 +/- 3.4), Constant Score (68.8 +/- 18.5 versus 83.1 +/- 11.6), and DASH (66.2 +/- 22.1 versus 44.2 +/- 14.9). Still, range of motion (ROM) differences were not significant, except for better forward flexion in the intact group (p < 0.039). Conclusions Both groups with intact repaired and retorn cuffs showed improvement in their condition, but unexpectedly, there is no significant correlation between patient satisfaction and rotator cuff integrity.

Rotator cuff repair with single row technique provides satisfying clinical results despite consistent MRI retear rate

Vecchini, Eugenio
;
Ricci, Matteo;Elena, Nicholas;Gasperotti, Luca;Cochetti, Andrea;Magnan, Bruno
2022

Abstract

Background The number of shoulder arthroscopies is steadily increasing to treat glenohumeral joint disorders, among which the rotator cuff tear is the most common. The prevalence of this condition ranges from 13% to 37% in the general population without considering the number of asymptomatic patients. The gold standard procedure for rotator cuff repair is still undefined. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a population who underwent a single row (SR) rotator cuff repair and correlate their clinical results with MRI findings. Materials and methods Sixty-seven consecutive rotator cuff procedures were retrospectively selected. All patients were diagnosed with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear and subsequently treated with an arthroscopic SR repair technique. Each patient was clinically assessed with the DASH questionnaire and the Constant-Murley Score to grade their satisfaction. Moreover, rotator cuff repair integrity was evaluated by MRI and graded using the Sugaya score. Results Mean follow-up was 19.5 +/- 5.7 months. The mean Constant score was 82.8 +/- 13.0 points, with 55 patients reporting excellent results. No patient scored less than 30 points, which could be deemed as unsatisfying. Meanwhile, on the DASH questionnaire, 6.1% of our patients rated their clinical outcome as unsatisfying, whereas 75.8% rated their outcome as excellent. Postoperative MRI classified 45 patients (83.3%) as either Sugaya type I, II, or III, whereas 9 patients (16.7%) presented a Sugaya type IV consistent with a full-thickness cuff retear. Of these nine patients, five (55.6%) and three (33.3%) reported excellent results for the Constant score and DASH questionnaire, respectively. The Mann-Whitney test reported that the retear group had worse scores than the intact repaired cuff group for pain (8.3 +/- 5.0 versus 13.1 +/- 3.4), Constant Score (68.8 +/- 18.5 versus 83.1 +/- 11.6), and DASH (66.2 +/- 22.1 versus 44.2 +/- 14.9). Still, range of motion (ROM) differences were not significant, except for better forward flexion in the intact group (p < 0.039). Conclusions Both groups with intact repaired and retorn cuffs showed improvement in their condition, but unexpectedly, there is no significant correlation between patient satisfaction and rotator cuff integrity.
Arthroscopy
MRI
Rotator cuff
Shoulder
Single-row repair
Arthroscopy
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Range of Motion, Articular
Retrospective Studies
Rotator Cuff
Treatment Outcome
Rotator Cuff Injuries
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1078390
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