Chronic plaque psoriasis is an immune-mediated skin disease with a chronic relapsing course, affecting up to ~2-3% of the general adult population worldwide. The interleukin (IL)-23/Th17 axis plays a key role in the pathogenesis of this skin disease and may represent a critical target for new targeted pharmacotherapies. Cutaneous lesions tend to recur in the same body areas, likely because of the reactivation of tissue-resident memory T cells. The spillover of different pro-inflammatory cytokines into systemic circulation can promote the onset of different comorbidities, including psoriatic arthritis. New targeted pharmacotherapies may lead to almost complete skin clearance and significant improvements in the patient's quality of life. Accumulating evidence supports the notion that early intervention with targeted pharmacotherapies could beneficially affect the clinical course of psoriatic disease at three different levels: (1) influencing the immune cells infiltrating the skin and gene expression, (2) the prevention of psoriasis-related comorbidities, especially psoriatic arthritis, and (3) the improvement of the patient's quality of life and reduction of cumulative life course impairment. The main aim of this narrative review is to summarize the effects that new targeted pharmacotherapies for psoriasis may have on the immune scar, both at the molecular and cellular level, on psoriatic arthritis and on the patient's quality of life.

Could Targeted Pharmacotherapies Exert a "Disease Modification Effect" in Patients with Chronic Plaque Psoriasis?

Bellinato, Francesco
;
Targher, Giovanni
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Gisondi, Paolo
2022-01-01

Abstract

Chronic plaque psoriasis is an immune-mediated skin disease with a chronic relapsing course, affecting up to ~2-3% of the general adult population worldwide. The interleukin (IL)-23/Th17 axis plays a key role in the pathogenesis of this skin disease and may represent a critical target for new targeted pharmacotherapies. Cutaneous lesions tend to recur in the same body areas, likely because of the reactivation of tissue-resident memory T cells. The spillover of different pro-inflammatory cytokines into systemic circulation can promote the onset of different comorbidities, including psoriatic arthritis. New targeted pharmacotherapies may lead to almost complete skin clearance and significant improvements in the patient's quality of life. Accumulating evidence supports the notion that early intervention with targeted pharmacotherapies could beneficially affect the clinical course of psoriatic disease at three different levels: (1) influencing the immune cells infiltrating the skin and gene expression, (2) the prevention of psoriasis-related comorbidities, especially psoriatic arthritis, and (3) the improvement of the patient's quality of life and reduction of cumulative life course impairment. The main aim of this narrative review is to summarize the effects that new targeted pharmacotherapies for psoriasis may have on the immune scar, both at the molecular and cellular level, on psoriatic arthritis and on the patient's quality of life.
biologics
psoriasis
psoriatic arthritis
quality of life
resident memory T cell
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1077928
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