Background/purpose of the study Although low skeletal muscle mass is associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), it is currently uncertain whether there are associations between weight-adjusted appendicular skeletal muscle (ASM%), severity of histological features of NAFLD, and the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3) rs738409 polymorphism. Our aim was to test for a possible influence of the PNPLA3 rs738409 variant on the association between ASM% and severity of NAFLD histological features. Methods We enrolled 401 Chinese male with biopsy-proven NAFLD. Using a bioelectrical-impedance body composition analyzer (BIA, Inbody 720, Japan Inc., Tokyo), we calculated the ASM% as the percentage of total appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM, kg)/total body mass (kg) x 100. Results Compared to those with high ASM%, patients with low ASM% (<= 30.6, i.e., the median value of distribution of the whole sample) had a greater severity of individual histological features of NAFLD. These patients also had a higher risk of severe steatosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) (adjusted-odds ratio [OR] 2.34, 95% CI 1.39-3.93, and adjusted-OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.30-3.77) even after adjusting for age, body mass index, diabetes, and serum creatinine levels. Carriage of the G allele of PNPLA3 rs738409 plus low ASM% was associated with a higher risk of severe steatosis and presence of liver fibrosis (OR 3.02, 95% CI 1.46-6.26, p = 0.003 and OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.03-4.60, p = 0.041 respectively), and there was a non-significant but borderline increased risk of NASH (OR 2.00, 95% CI 0.98-4.06, p = 0.056). Conclusions Low ASM% and the presence of a G allele within PNPLA3 rs738409 is associated with more severe histological features of NAFLD.

Low skeletal muscle mass is associated with more severe histological features of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in male

Targher, Giovanni
Writing – Review & Editing
;
2022

Abstract

Background/purpose of the study Although low skeletal muscle mass is associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), it is currently uncertain whether there are associations between weight-adjusted appendicular skeletal muscle (ASM%), severity of histological features of NAFLD, and the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3) rs738409 polymorphism. Our aim was to test for a possible influence of the PNPLA3 rs738409 variant on the association between ASM% and severity of NAFLD histological features. Methods We enrolled 401 Chinese male with biopsy-proven NAFLD. Using a bioelectrical-impedance body composition analyzer (BIA, Inbody 720, Japan Inc., Tokyo), we calculated the ASM% as the percentage of total appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM, kg)/total body mass (kg) x 100. Results Compared to those with high ASM%, patients with low ASM% (<= 30.6, i.e., the median value of distribution of the whole sample) had a greater severity of individual histological features of NAFLD. These patients also had a higher risk of severe steatosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) (adjusted-odds ratio [OR] 2.34, 95% CI 1.39-3.93, and adjusted-OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.30-3.77) even after adjusting for age, body mass index, diabetes, and serum creatinine levels. Carriage of the G allele of PNPLA3 rs738409 plus low ASM% was associated with a higher risk of severe steatosis and presence of liver fibrosis (OR 3.02, 95% CI 1.46-6.26, p = 0.003 and OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.03-4.60, p = 0.041 respectively), and there was a non-significant but borderline increased risk of NASH (OR 2.00, 95% CI 0.98-4.06, p = 0.056). Conclusions Low ASM% and the presence of a G allele within PNPLA3 rs738409 is associated with more severe histological features of NAFLD.
Creatinine
Membrane Proteins
Phospholipases
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
Patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3
Sarcopenia
Skeletal muscle mass
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Lipase
Liver
Male
Muscle, Skeletal
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1077107
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