Currently, there are limited data regarding the long-term effect of liver stiffness on glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We prospectively followed an outpatient sample of 61 consecutive postmenopausal women with T2DM and NAFLD who had baseline data on liver ultrasonography and Fibroscan®-assessed liver stiffness measurement (LSM) in 2017 and who underwent follow-up in 2022. Haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was measured both at baseline and follow-up. At baseline, 52 patients had NAFLD (hepatic steatosis) alone, and 9 had NAFLD with coexisting clinically significant fibrosis (defined as LSM ≥ 7 kPa on Fibroscan®). At follow-up, 16 patients had a worsening of glycaemic control (arbitrarily defined as HbA1c increase ≥ 0.5% from baseline). The prevalence of NAFLD and coexisting clinically significant fibrosis at baseline was at least three times greater among patients who developed worse glycaemic control at follow-up, compared with those who did not (31.3% vs. 8.9%; p = 0.030). In logistic regression analysis, the presence of NAFLD and clinically significant fibrosis was associated with an approximately 4.5-fold increased likelihood of developing worse glycaemic control at follow-up (odds ratio 4.66, 95% confidence interval 1.07-20.3; p = 0.041), even after adjustment for baseline confounding factors, such as age, body mass index, haemoglobin A1c (or HOMA-estimated insulin resistance) and use of some glucose-lowering agents that may positively affect NAFLD and liver fibrosis. In conclusion, our results suggest that the presence of Fibroscan®-assessed significant fibrosis was associated with a higher risk of developing worse glycaemic control in postmenopausal women with T2DM and NAFLD.

Long-Term Adverse Effect of Liver Stiffness on Glycaemic Control in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Pilot Study

Mantovani, Alessandro;Taverna, Antonio;Cappelli, Davide;Beatrice, Giorgia;Csermely, Alessandro;Sani, Elena;Targher, Giovanni
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
2022

Abstract

Currently, there are limited data regarding the long-term effect of liver stiffness on glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We prospectively followed an outpatient sample of 61 consecutive postmenopausal women with T2DM and NAFLD who had baseline data on liver ultrasonography and Fibroscan®-assessed liver stiffness measurement (LSM) in 2017 and who underwent follow-up in 2022. Haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was measured both at baseline and follow-up. At baseline, 52 patients had NAFLD (hepatic steatosis) alone, and 9 had NAFLD with coexisting clinically significant fibrosis (defined as LSM ≥ 7 kPa on Fibroscan®). At follow-up, 16 patients had a worsening of glycaemic control (arbitrarily defined as HbA1c increase ≥ 0.5% from baseline). The prevalence of NAFLD and coexisting clinically significant fibrosis at baseline was at least three times greater among patients who developed worse glycaemic control at follow-up, compared with those who did not (31.3% vs. 8.9%; p = 0.030). In logistic regression analysis, the presence of NAFLD and clinically significant fibrosis was associated with an approximately 4.5-fold increased likelihood of developing worse glycaemic control at follow-up (odds ratio 4.66, 95% confidence interval 1.07-20.3; p = 0.041), even after adjustment for baseline confounding factors, such as age, body mass index, haemoglobin A1c (or HOMA-estimated insulin resistance) and use of some glucose-lowering agents that may positively affect NAFLD and liver fibrosis. In conclusion, our results suggest that the presence of Fibroscan®-assessed significant fibrosis was associated with a higher risk of developing worse glycaemic control in postmenopausal women with T2DM and NAFLD.
Pilot Projects
Liver Cirrhosis
Glucose
MAFLD
NAFLD
T2DM
fibrosis
liver stiffness
metabolic associated fatty liver disease
nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
type 2 diabetes
Humans
Female
Glycated Hemoglobin A
Glycemic Control
Liver
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1077106
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