The general population, but especially older adults, were forced or encouraged to stay home during the recent COVID-19 pandemic. In this context, indoor mobility (IM, the number of steps performed daily at home) may be informative about the general health status of older adults. The present study aimed at evaluating the relationship between IM, frailty (loss of functional reserve including both physical and psychosocial domains), and disability (loss of autonomy measured as activities of daily life, ADLs) in a sample of community-dwelling Italian older adults. Specifically, the primary objective was to investigate IM and disability differences between robust and frail older adults. The secondary objective was to test if frailty is in the causal sequence between IM and disability, i.e., as a mediator in their relationship. Thirty-two participants (mean age = 70 ± 6 years; 56.2% women) were recruited. Frailty and disability were evaluated using the Tilburg Frailty Indicator and the Groningen Activity Restriction Scale, respectively. IM at home was measured via an Adamo wristwatch (a connected accelerometer). One-way analyses of covariance, controlling for age and gender, showed that robust participants, classified according to a score higher than five points in the Tilburg Frailty Indicator, performed significantly more IM (F1,28 = 4.639; p = 0.04) and presented lower disability grade than frail ones (F1,28 = 4.342; p =0.046). Only physical frailty was a mediator in the relationship between IM and disability (F2,29 = 8.538, p < 0.001), with a fully mediated model (z = -2.073, p < 0.04). Conversely, the total frailty score was not a mediator in the same relationship, but with IM accounted for the variance in disability (F2,29 = 8.538, p < 0.001; R2 = 33.7%). Our results suggested that frail older adults restricted their IM more and presented a higher level of disability compared to robust older adults. Moreover, data suggest that IM reduction may have a negative impact on physical frailty and indirectly increase disability.

Indoor mobility, frailty, and disability in community-dwelling older adults: a mediation model

Brustio, Paolo Riccardo
;
D'Emanuele, Samuel;
2022

Abstract

The general population, but especially older adults, were forced or encouraged to stay home during the recent COVID-19 pandemic. In this context, indoor mobility (IM, the number of steps performed daily at home) may be informative about the general health status of older adults. The present study aimed at evaluating the relationship between IM, frailty (loss of functional reserve including both physical and psychosocial domains), and disability (loss of autonomy measured as activities of daily life, ADLs) in a sample of community-dwelling Italian older adults. Specifically, the primary objective was to investigate IM and disability differences between robust and frail older adults. The secondary objective was to test if frailty is in the causal sequence between IM and disability, i.e., as a mediator in their relationship. Thirty-two participants (mean age = 70 ± 6 years; 56.2% women) were recruited. Frailty and disability were evaluated using the Tilburg Frailty Indicator and the Groningen Activity Restriction Scale, respectively. IM at home was measured via an Adamo wristwatch (a connected accelerometer). One-way analyses of covariance, controlling for age and gender, showed that robust participants, classified according to a score higher than five points in the Tilburg Frailty Indicator, performed significantly more IM (F1,28 = 4.639; p = 0.04) and presented lower disability grade than frail ones (F1,28 = 4.342; p =0.046). Only physical frailty was a mediator in the relationship between IM and disability (F2,29 = 8.538, p < 0.001), with a fully mediated model (z = -2.073, p < 0.04). Conversely, the total frailty score was not a mediator in the same relationship, but with IM accounted for the variance in disability (F2,29 = 8.538, p < 0.001; R2 = 33.7%). Our results suggested that frail older adults restricted their IM more and presented a higher level of disability compared to robust older adults. Moreover, data suggest that IM reduction may have a negative impact on physical frailty and indirectly increase disability.
walking
Adamo
active living
aged population
physical activity
physical frailty
ADL
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1076992
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