Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are usually unable to express abdominal discomfort properly, and thus gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS) are sometimes shadowed by aggression, which is sometimes misunderstood as a behavioral characteristic of ASD. Several studies have reported interesting correlations between the severity of behavioral and gastrointestinal symptoms in ASD children. The present study aimed to investigate the potential effects of probiotics as an adjuvant therapy to modulate the clinical status of ASD children. This study included 40 children with ASD aged 2-5 years. The feeding product was prepared from whey powder (without casein) and some minced cooked yellow vegetables in adequate ratios fortified with the studied probiotic strains (Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp.). Bifidobacterium strains were assessed from stool samples of children with ASD. Bifidobacterium strains were analyzed in the stools of ASD children. Recruited ASD patients received 10 g of the nutritional supplement once a day for 3 months. Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) and Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADIR) were reevaluated clinically. Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms-Rome III Version was used for all children with ASD before and after. There is a significant increase in the colony counts of both Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp., which present in the stool of ASD children after probiotic supplementation for 3 months. It was highly significant in the case of Bifidobacterium spp. (p value 0.000) and a significant increase in Lactobacillus spp. (p value 0.015). The present study showed reduced anxiety and observation of deep sleep for children with ASD (80%) after taking the supplementation. This indicates that probiotics may have a potential effect in reducing symptoms and severity of ASD and in correcting dysbiosis.

Molecular characterization of probiotics and their influence on children with autism spectrum disorder

Chirumbolo, Salvatore;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are usually unable to express abdominal discomfort properly, and thus gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS) are sometimes shadowed by aggression, which is sometimes misunderstood as a behavioral characteristic of ASD. Several studies have reported interesting correlations between the severity of behavioral and gastrointestinal symptoms in ASD children. The present study aimed to investigate the potential effects of probiotics as an adjuvant therapy to modulate the clinical status of ASD children. This study included 40 children with ASD aged 2-5 years. The feeding product was prepared from whey powder (without casein) and some minced cooked yellow vegetables in adequate ratios fortified with the studied probiotic strains (Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp.). Bifidobacterium strains were assessed from stool samples of children with ASD. Bifidobacterium strains were analyzed in the stools of ASD children. Recruited ASD patients received 10 g of the nutritional supplement once a day for 3 months. Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) and Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADIR) were reevaluated clinically. Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms-Rome III Version was used for all children with ASD before and after. There is a significant increase in the colony counts of both Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp., which present in the stool of ASD children after probiotic supplementation for 3 months. It was highly significant in the case of Bifidobacterium spp. (p value 0.000) and a significant increase in Lactobacillus spp. (p value 0.015). The present study showed reduced anxiety and observation of deep sleep for children with ASD (80%) after taking the supplementation. This indicates that probiotics may have a potential effect in reducing symptoms and severity of ASD and in correcting dysbiosis.
Autism
Bifidobacterium spp
Lactobacillus spp
Probiotics
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1076516
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