Many occupations can influence the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS). This systematic review aims to evaluate studies on MetS prevalence in different occupational groups from different countries. An integrative review of the literature was conducted within the PubMed and Web of Science databases between January 2005 and February 2022. Only studies with over 3000 subjects that presented data about the prevalence of MetS in different occupational groups were included. The classification of occupational groups was based on the statistical category of economic activities in the European Community (EC). Of a total of 1942 screened records, 10 studies were included, showing that MetS is a common health (main) risk factor in all occupational groups. However, the prevalence of MetS varies between nationalities, between and within occupational groups, and between genders. The reasons for this variation appear complex and supported by several causal explanations. The prevalence of MetS was highest among women in a group of Korean skilled agricultural, forestry, and fishery workers (Prevalence: 39.2%). Similarly, among men, the highest prevalence was found in Korean equipment, machine operating, and assembling workers (Prevalence: 35.4%). Male information and communication technology professionals from the Netherlands (Prevalence: 6.2%) and Spanish female catering and hospitality, personal, and security service workers (Prevalence: 5.9%) had the lowest rates of MetS. Overall, the results indicated that valid data on this topic are insufficient, and more randomized controlled trials are needed. Moreover, the different definitions of MetS complicate the accurate comparison between studies, paving the way to achieving consensus on a universal definition of MetS.

A systematic review of prevalence of metabolic syndrome in occupational groups - Does occupation matter in the global epidemic of metabolic syndrome?

Lippi, Giuseppe;
In corso di stampa

Abstract

Many occupations can influence the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS). This systematic review aims to evaluate studies on MetS prevalence in different occupational groups from different countries. An integrative review of the literature was conducted within the PubMed and Web of Science databases between January 2005 and February 2022. Only studies with over 3000 subjects that presented data about the prevalence of MetS in different occupational groups were included. The classification of occupational groups was based on the statistical category of economic activities in the European Community (EC). Of a total of 1942 screened records, 10 studies were included, showing that MetS is a common health (main) risk factor in all occupational groups. However, the prevalence of MetS varies between nationalities, between and within occupational groups, and between genders. The reasons for this variation appear complex and supported by several causal explanations. The prevalence of MetS was highest among women in a group of Korean skilled agricultural, forestry, and fishery workers (Prevalence: 39.2%). Similarly, among men, the highest prevalence was found in Korean equipment, machine operating, and assembling workers (Prevalence: 35.4%). Male information and communication technology professionals from the Netherlands (Prevalence: 6.2%) and Spanish female catering and hospitality, personal, and security service workers (Prevalence: 5.9%) had the lowest rates of MetS. Overall, the results indicated that valid data on this topic are insufficient, and more randomized controlled trials are needed. Moreover, the different definitions of MetS complicate the accurate comparison between studies, paving the way to achieving consensus on a universal definition of MetS.
Metabolic risk, Metabolic syndrome, Occupation, Occupational groups
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1074909
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