During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), high flows can allow an adequate perfusion to kidneys, but, on the other hand, they could cause emboli production, increased vascular pressure, and a more intense inflammatory response, which are in turn causes of renal damage. Along with demographic variables, other intra-operative management and post-operative events, this might lead to Acute kidney injury (AKI) in infants undergoing cardiac surgery. The aim of our study was to investigate if a CPB strategy with flow requirements based on monitoring of continuous metabolic and hemodynamic parameters could have an impact on outcomes, with a focus on renal damage. Thirty-four consecutive infants and young children undergoing surgery requiring CPB, comparable as for demographic and patho-physiological profile, were included. In Group A, 16 patients underwent, for a variable period of 20 min, CPB aiming for the minimal flow that could maintain values of MVO2 > 70% and frontal NIRS (both left and right) > 45%, and renal NIRS > 65%. In Group B, 18 patients underwent nominal flows CPB. Tapered CPB allowed for a mean reduction of flows of 34%. No difference in terms of blood-gas analysis, spectroscopy trend, laboratory analyses, and hospital outcome were recorded. In patients developing AKI (20%), renal damage was correlated with demographic characteristics and with renal NIRS during the first 6 h in the ICU. A safe individualized strategy for conduction of CPB, which allows significant flow reduction while maintaining normal hemodynamic and metabolic parameters, does not impact on renal function and hospital outcomes.

Impact on Renal Function and Hospital Outcomes of an Individualized Management of Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Congenital Heart Surgery: A Pilot Study

Abbasciano, Riccardo Giuseppe;Hoxha, Stiljan;Gaburro, Dania;Menon, Tiziano;Gottin, Leonardo;Faggian, Giuseppe;Luciani, Giovanni Battista
2021

Abstract

During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), high flows can allow an adequate perfusion to kidneys, but, on the other hand, they could cause emboli production, increased vascular pressure, and a more intense inflammatory response, which are in turn causes of renal damage. Along with demographic variables, other intra-operative management and post-operative events, this might lead to Acute kidney injury (AKI) in infants undergoing cardiac surgery. The aim of our study was to investigate if a CPB strategy with flow requirements based on monitoring of continuous metabolic and hemodynamic parameters could have an impact on outcomes, with a focus on renal damage. Thirty-four consecutive infants and young children undergoing surgery requiring CPB, comparable as for demographic and patho-physiological profile, were included. In Group A, 16 patients underwent, for a variable period of 20 min, CPB aiming for the minimal flow that could maintain values of MVO2 > 70% and frontal NIRS (both left and right) > 45%, and renal NIRS > 65%. In Group B, 18 patients underwent nominal flows CPB. Tapered CPB allowed for a mean reduction of flows of 34%. No difference in terms of blood-gas analysis, spectroscopy trend, laboratory analyses, and hospital outcome were recorded. In patients developing AKI (20%), renal damage was correlated with demographic characteristics and with renal NIRS during the first 6 h in the ICU. A safe individualized strategy for conduction of CPB, which allows significant flow reduction while maintaining normal hemodynamic and metabolic parameters, does not impact on renal function and hospital outcomes.
Acute kidney injury
Cardiac surgery
Cardiopulmonary bypass
Congenital heart diseases
Organ protection
Child
Child, Preschool
Hospitals
Humans
Infant
Kidney
Pilot Projects
Cardiopulmonary Bypass
Heart Defects, Congenital
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1074745
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