Acquired hemophilia A (AHA), a rare but life-threatening disorder, most commonly occurs in older people and during pregnancy. During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination campaign, an unexpected number of newly diagnosed AHA patients have been identified in clinical practice that were temporally related to COVID-19 vaccination. We present the result of a signal detection analysis aimed at exploring a possible association between COVID-19 immunization and occurrence of AHA. A disproportionality analysis on the World Health Organization (WHO) database was performed to investigate the presence of a signal of risk for AHA associated with COVID-19 vaccines. Reports of AHA associated with any COVID-19 vaccine included in the WHO database were then integrated with those available on the Food and Drug Administration Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System and those published in the medical literature. The WHO database included 146 reports of AHA. The information component (IC) was significant for the association of AHA with all COVID-19 vaccines (IC025: 1.1) and with the vaccine product BNT162b2 (IC025: 1.6). After duplicate exclusion, 96 unique cases of AHA following COVID-19 vaccines have been reviewed. Median time to diagnosis was 18 days and 40% of cases documented the occurrence after the second dose. Overall, in 57% of the investigated cases, a preexisting condition predisposing to AHA was excluded. About 22% of cases occurred in subjects with age ≤65 years and there was no case associated with pregnancy. Mortality was 11%. Although we cannot exclude that the unexpected frequency of AHA diagnosis can be explained by a detection bias, the signal for COVID-19 vaccine-related AHA is robust and deserves further investigations.

Investigating a Signal of Acquired Hemophilia Associated with COVID-19 Vaccination: A Systematic Case Review

Moretti, Ugo;
2022

Abstract

Acquired hemophilia A (AHA), a rare but life-threatening disorder, most commonly occurs in older people and during pregnancy. During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination campaign, an unexpected number of newly diagnosed AHA patients have been identified in clinical practice that were temporally related to COVID-19 vaccination. We present the result of a signal detection analysis aimed at exploring a possible association between COVID-19 immunization and occurrence of AHA. A disproportionality analysis on the World Health Organization (WHO) database was performed to investigate the presence of a signal of risk for AHA associated with COVID-19 vaccines. Reports of AHA associated with any COVID-19 vaccine included in the WHO database were then integrated with those available on the Food and Drug Administration Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System and those published in the medical literature. The WHO database included 146 reports of AHA. The information component (IC) was significant for the association of AHA with all COVID-19 vaccines (IC025: 1.1) and with the vaccine product BNT162b2 (IC025: 1.6). After duplicate exclusion, 96 unique cases of AHA following COVID-19 vaccines have been reviewed. Median time to diagnosis was 18 days and 40% of cases documented the occurrence after the second dose. Overall, in 57% of the investigated cases, a preexisting condition predisposing to AHA was excluded. About 22% of cases occurred in subjects with age ≤65 years and there was no case associated with pregnancy. Mortality was 11%. Although we cannot exclude that the unexpected frequency of AHA diagnosis can be explained by a detection bias, the signal for COVID-19 vaccine-related AHA is robust and deserves further investigations.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/1073513
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