Study objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children is associated with acute metabolic, cardiovascular, and neuro-cognitive abnormalities. The long-term outcomes of childhood OSA into adulthood has not been established. We performed a 20-year follow-up of patients with polysomnographically documented OSA in childhood compared to a healthy control group to evaluate the long-term anthropometric, sleep, cognitive, and cardiovascular outcomes. Methods: Children diagnosed to have severe OSA between the ages of 1 - 17 years (4.87 ± 2.77) were prospectively contacted by telephone as young adults after approximately 20 years. Data collected included reported anthropometric, educational level, health history, and the Berlin questionnaire. Results: Young adults with confirmed severe OSA in childhood had significantly higher adulthood BMI (p=0.038), lower academic degrees (p<0.001), and more snoring (p=0.045) compared to controls. The AHI during childhood trended towards predicting cardiovascular outcomes and the Berlin questionnaire in adulthood. Conclusions: Adults with history of severe childhood OSA have a high risk of having snoring, elevated BMI, and lower academic achievement in adulthood. Thus, children with severe OSA may be at increased risk of chronic diseases later in life. The intervening COVID-19 pandemic has introduced considerable additional neurobehavioral morbidity complicating the identification of the full long-term consequences of childhood OSA.

Twenty-year follow-up of children with obstructive sleep apnea

Zaffanello, Marco
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Ferrante, Giuliana
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Piacentini, Giorgio
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Study objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children is associated with acute metabolic, cardiovascular, and neuro-cognitive abnormalities. The long-term outcomes of childhood OSA into adulthood has not been established. We performed a 20-year follow-up of patients with polysomnographically documented OSA in childhood compared to a healthy control group to evaluate the long-term anthropometric, sleep, cognitive, and cardiovascular outcomes. Methods: Children diagnosed to have severe OSA between the ages of 1 - 17 years (4.87 ± 2.77) were prospectively contacted by telephone as young adults after approximately 20 years. Data collected included reported anthropometric, educational level, health history, and the Berlin questionnaire. Results: Young adults with confirmed severe OSA in childhood had significantly higher adulthood BMI (p=0.038), lower academic degrees (p<0.001), and more snoring (p=0.045) compared to controls. The AHI during childhood trended towards predicting cardiovascular outcomes and the Berlin questionnaire in adulthood. Conclusions: Adults with history of severe childhood OSA have a high risk of having snoring, elevated BMI, and lower academic achievement in adulthood. Thus, children with severe OSA may be at increased risk of chronic diseases later in life. The intervening COVID-19 pandemic has introduced considerable additional neurobehavioral morbidity complicating the identification of the full long-term consequences of childhood OSA.
COVID-19
children
obstructive sleep apnea
sleep-disordered breathing
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1073386
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