Achromobacter spp. can establish occasional or chronic lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Chronic colonization has been associated with worse prognosis highlighting the need to identify markers of bacterial persistence. To this purpose, we analyzed phenotypic features of 95 Achromobacter spp. isolates from 38 patients presenting chronic or occasional infection. Virulence was tested in Galleria mellonella larvae, cytotoxicity was tested in human bronchial epithelial cells, biofilm production in static conditions was measured by crystal violet staining and susceptibility to selected antibiotics was tested by the disk diffusion method. The presence of genetic loci associated to the analyzed phenotypic features was evaluated by a genome-wide association study. Isolates from occasional infection induced significantly higher mortality of G. mellonella larvae and showed a trend for lower cytotoxicity than chronic infection isolates. No significant difference was observed in biofilm production among the two groups. Additionally, antibiotic susceptibility testing showed that isolates from chronically-infected patients were significantly more resistant to sulfonamides and meropenem than occasional isolates. Candidate genetic biomarkers associated with antibiotic resistance or sensitivity were identified. Achromobacter spp. strains isolated from people with chronic and occasional lung infection exhibit different virulence and antibiotic susceptibility features, which could be linked to persistence in CF lungs. This underlines the possibility of identifying predictive biomarkers of persistence that could be useful for clinical purposes.

Achromobacter spp. adaptation in cystic fibrosis infection and candidate biomarkers of antimicrobial resistance

Sandri, Angela;Veschetti, Laura
;
Saitta, Giulia Maria;Passarelli Mantovani, Rebeca;Carelli, Maria;Burlacchini, Gloria;Preato, Sara;Sorio, Claudio;Melotti, Paola;Patuzzo, Cristina;Signoretto, Caterina;Boaretti, Marzia;Lleò, Maria M;Malerba, Giovanni
2022

Abstract

Achromobacter spp. can establish occasional or chronic lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Chronic colonization has been associated with worse prognosis highlighting the need to identify markers of bacterial persistence. To this purpose, we analyzed phenotypic features of 95 Achromobacter spp. isolates from 38 patients presenting chronic or occasional infection. Virulence was tested in Galleria mellonella larvae, cytotoxicity was tested in human bronchial epithelial cells, biofilm production in static conditions was measured by crystal violet staining and susceptibility to selected antibiotics was tested by the disk diffusion method. The presence of genetic loci associated to the analyzed phenotypic features was evaluated by a genome-wide association study. Isolates from occasional infection induced significantly higher mortality of G. mellonella larvae and showed a trend for lower cytotoxicity than chronic infection isolates. No significant difference was observed in biofilm production among the two groups. Additionally, antibiotic susceptibility testing showed that isolates from chronically-infected patients were significantly more resistant to sulfonamides and meropenem than occasional isolates. Candidate genetic biomarkers associated with antibiotic resistance or sensitivity were identified. Achromobacter spp. strains isolated from people with chronic and occasional lung infection exhibit different virulence and antibiotic susceptibility features, which could be linked to persistence in CF lungs. This underlines the possibility of identifying predictive biomarkers of persistence that could be useful for clinical purposes.
Achromobacter
adaptation
biomarkers
cystic fibrosis
drug resistance
virulence
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/1073230
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