The clinical symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) disease are accompanied by severely debilitating extra-pulmonary manifestations, including vascular dysfunction and hypertension. This systematic review evaluated the current evidence for several therapeutic interventions, targeting the nitric oxide (NO) pathway on hemodynamics and, secondarily, exercise capacity in patients with COPD. A comprehensive search on COPD and NO donors was performed on online databases. Of 934 initially found manuscripts, 27 were included in the review, and 16 in the meta-analysis. The analysis indicated inconsistent effects of dietary nitrate supplementation on exercise tolerance in COPD patients. Dietary nitrate supplementation decreased systolic (-3.7 ± 4.3 mmHg; p = 0.10) and diastolic blood pressure (BP; -2.6 ± 3.2 mmHg; p = 0.05) compared with placebo. When restricted to acute studies, a clinically relevant BP lowering effect of nitrate supplementation during diastole was observed (-4.7 ± 3.2 mmHg; n = 5; p = 0.05). In contrast, inhaled NO (iNO) at doses <20 ppm (+9.2 ± 11.3 mmHg) and 25-40 ppm (-5±2 mmHg) resulted in inconsistent effects on PaO2 (p = 0.48). Data on the effect of iNO on exercise capacity were too limited and inconsistent, but preliminary evidence suggests a possible benefit of iNO on pulmonary vascular resistance during exercise in severe COPD patients. Overall, the effects of acute dietary nitrate supplementation on BP may be of clinical relevance as an adjunct therapy and deserve further investigation in large sample size studies of COPD patients with and without cardiovascular comorbidities. iNO exerted inconsistent physiological effects, with the use of high doses posing safety risks.

Strategies targeting the NO pathway to counteract extra-pulmonary manifestations of COPD: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Giuriato, Gaia;Paneroni, Mara;Venturelli, Massimo;
2022

Abstract

The clinical symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) disease are accompanied by severely debilitating extra-pulmonary manifestations, including vascular dysfunction and hypertension. This systematic review evaluated the current evidence for several therapeutic interventions, targeting the nitric oxide (NO) pathway on hemodynamics and, secondarily, exercise capacity in patients with COPD. A comprehensive search on COPD and NO donors was performed on online databases. Of 934 initially found manuscripts, 27 were included in the review, and 16 in the meta-analysis. The analysis indicated inconsistent effects of dietary nitrate supplementation on exercise tolerance in COPD patients. Dietary nitrate supplementation decreased systolic (-3.7 ± 4.3 mmHg; p = 0.10) and diastolic blood pressure (BP; -2.6 ± 3.2 mmHg; p = 0.05) compared with placebo. When restricted to acute studies, a clinically relevant BP lowering effect of nitrate supplementation during diastole was observed (-4.7 ± 3.2 mmHg; n = 5; p = 0.05). In contrast, inhaled NO (iNO) at doses <20 ppm (+9.2 ± 11.3 mmHg) and 25-40 ppm (-5±2 mmHg) resulted in inconsistent effects on PaO2 (p = 0.48). Data on the effect of iNO on exercise capacity were too limited and inconsistent, but preliminary evidence suggests a possible benefit of iNO on pulmonary vascular resistance during exercise in severe COPD patients. Overall, the effects of acute dietary nitrate supplementation on BP may be of clinical relevance as an adjunct therapy and deserve further investigation in large sample size studies of COPD patients with and without cardiovascular comorbidities. iNO exerted inconsistent physiological effects, with the use of high doses posing safety risks.
Beetroot juice
COPD
Exercise
Nitrate
Nitric oxide
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/1072746
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