Widely used in daily practice, handgrip strength (HGS) is a low cost, easy-to-use, and portable test to assess overall muscle and physical function. It can be used as a stand-alone or a first-line tool for evaluating muscle weakness, though controversy surrounds its use for assessing global or lower limb muscle function. Lower limb mobility and physical activity are reduced with advancing age. This decline is difficult to quantify with isokinetic or isometric devices in routine settings (hospital and nursing home). For this narrative review we explored and summarized the findings of studies that investigated the association between HGS, lower limb muscle strength, and physical performance in older adults. The review also provides directions for future research. We noted contrasting findings for an association between HGS, lower limb strength, and physical performance. We found insufficient evidence for endorsing the handgrip dynamometer as a definitive tool for measuring overall muscle strength and physical function. More evidence is needed from comparable studies involving larger samples of men and women and investigating other areas such as lifestyle, daily physical activity levels, and health-related disorders.

Exploring the association between handgrip, lower limb muscle strength, and physical function in older adults: a narrative review

Tatangelo T.;Muollo V.;Ghiotto L.;Schena F.;Rossi A. P.
2022

Abstract

Widely used in daily practice, handgrip strength (HGS) is a low cost, easy-to-use, and portable test to assess overall muscle and physical function. It can be used as a stand-alone or a first-line tool for evaluating muscle weakness, though controversy surrounds its use for assessing global or lower limb muscle function. Lower limb mobility and physical activity are reduced with advancing age. This decline is difficult to quantify with isokinetic or isometric devices in routine settings (hospital and nursing home). For this narrative review we explored and summarized the findings of studies that investigated the association between HGS, lower limb muscle strength, and physical performance in older adults. The review also provides directions for future research. We noted contrasting findings for an association between HGS, lower limb strength, and physical performance. We found insufficient evidence for endorsing the handgrip dynamometer as a definitive tool for measuring overall muscle strength and physical function. More evidence is needed from comparable studies involving larger samples of men and women and investigating other areas such as lifestyle, daily physical activity levels, and health-related disorders.
Dynapenia
Handgrip strength
Lower limb strength
Physical function
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/1072310
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