The infectious respiratory condition COVID-19 manifests a clinical course ranging from mild/moderate up-to critical systemic dysfunction and death linked to thromboinflammation. During COVID-19 infection, neutrophil extracellular traps participating in cytokine storm and coagulation dysfunction have emerged as diagnostic/prognostic markers. The characterization of NET identified that mainly histones, have the potential to initiate and propagate inflammatory storm and thrombosis, leading to increased disease severity and decreased patient survival. Baseline assessment and serial monitoring of blood histone concentration may be conceivably useful in COVID-19. We performed a literature review to explore the association among increased circulating levels of histones, disease severity/mortality in COVID-19 patients, and comparison of histone values between COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients. We carried out an electronic search in Medline and Scopus, using the keywords "COVID-19" OR "SARS-CoV-2" AND "histone" OR "citrullinated histones" OR "hyperhistonemia", between 2019 and present time (i.e., June 07th, 2022), which allowed to select 17 studies, totaling 1,846 subjects. We found that substantially elevated histone values were consistently present in all COVID-19 patients who developed unfavorable clinical outcomes. These findings suggest that blood histone monitoring upon admission and throughout hospitalization may be useful for early identification of higher risk of unfavorable COVID-19 progression. Therapeutic decisions in patients with SARS-CoV-2 based on the use of histone cut-off values may be driven by drugs engaging histones, finally leading to the limitation of cytotoxic, inflammatory, and thrombotic effects of circulating histones in viral sepsis

What is the impact of circulating histones in COVID-19: a systematic review

Lippi, Giuseppe;
2022

Abstract

The infectious respiratory condition COVID-19 manifests a clinical course ranging from mild/moderate up-to critical systemic dysfunction and death linked to thromboinflammation. During COVID-19 infection, neutrophil extracellular traps participating in cytokine storm and coagulation dysfunction have emerged as diagnostic/prognostic markers. The characterization of NET identified that mainly histones, have the potential to initiate and propagate inflammatory storm and thrombosis, leading to increased disease severity and decreased patient survival. Baseline assessment and serial monitoring of blood histone concentration may be conceivably useful in COVID-19. We performed a literature review to explore the association among increased circulating levels of histones, disease severity/mortality in COVID-19 patients, and comparison of histone values between COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients. We carried out an electronic search in Medline and Scopus, using the keywords "COVID-19" OR "SARS-CoV-2" AND "histone" OR "citrullinated histones" OR "hyperhistonemia", between 2019 and present time (i.e., June 07th, 2022), which allowed to select 17 studies, totaling 1,846 subjects. We found that substantially elevated histone values were consistently present in all COVID-19 patients who developed unfavorable clinical outcomes. These findings suggest that blood histone monitoring upon admission and throughout hospitalization may be useful for early identification of higher risk of unfavorable COVID-19 progression. Therapeutic decisions in patients with SARS-CoV-2 based on the use of histone cut-off values may be driven by drugs engaging histones, finally leading to the limitation of cytotoxic, inflammatory, and thrombotic effects of circulating histones in viral sepsis
COVID-19, NETosis, NETs, SARS-CoV-2, citrullinated histone, heparins and heparinoids, histone, systematic review, thrombo-inflammation
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1071266
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