Introduction: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication among hospitalized patients, potentially affecting short- and long-term clinical outcomes. In this retrospective study, we evaluated renal outcomes in noncritically ill patients who required acute hemodialysis (HD) because of an AKI episode occurring during hospitalization. Methods: Sixty-three hemodynamically stable patients with AKI undergoing acute intermittent HD were included. Kidney function was evaluated at baseline control (pre-AKI), at AKI diagnosis and during the follow-up. According to serum creatinine and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), we defined three clinical conditions: renal recovery, different stages of acute kidney disease (AKD), and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Results: Among the 63 patients evaluated, 34 patients (54%) had a history of CKD. Six patients (10%) presented early full renal recovery. HD treatment was stopped in 38 patients (60%), while 25 patients (40%) required maintenance HD. Dialysis-independent patients presented lower comorbidity and higher baseline eGFR and delta creatinine, compared to dialysis-dependent patients. Baseline CKD, previous AKI episodes, and parenchymal causes of AKI were associated with a significant risk of dialysis dependence. At 1-month control, 15 patients (39%) presented AKD stage 0, 6 patients (16%) AKD stage 1, and 17 patients (44%) AKD stage 2-3. At 3-month control, 29 out of 38 patients recovering from AKI (76%) presented CKD. AKD stage was significantly correlated with the risk of CKD development, which, resulted higher in patients with lower baseline eGFR. Conclusions: AKI might represent a risk factor for the development of chronic kidney damage, even in noncritically ill patients.

Renal Outcomes of Dialysis-Dependent Acute Kidney Injury in Noncritically Ill Patients: A Retrospective Study

BATTAGLIA, YURI;
2022

Abstract

Introduction: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication among hospitalized patients, potentially affecting short- and long-term clinical outcomes. In this retrospective study, we evaluated renal outcomes in noncritically ill patients who required acute hemodialysis (HD) because of an AKI episode occurring during hospitalization. Methods: Sixty-three hemodynamically stable patients with AKI undergoing acute intermittent HD were included. Kidney function was evaluated at baseline control (pre-AKI), at AKI diagnosis and during the follow-up. According to serum creatinine and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), we defined three clinical conditions: renal recovery, different stages of acute kidney disease (AKD), and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Results: Among the 63 patients evaluated, 34 patients (54%) had a history of CKD. Six patients (10%) presented early full renal recovery. HD treatment was stopped in 38 patients (60%), while 25 patients (40%) required maintenance HD. Dialysis-independent patients presented lower comorbidity and higher baseline eGFR and delta creatinine, compared to dialysis-dependent patients. Baseline CKD, previous AKI episodes, and parenchymal causes of AKI were associated with a significant risk of dialysis dependence. At 1-month control, 15 patients (39%) presented AKD stage 0, 6 patients (16%) AKD stage 1, and 17 patients (44%) AKD stage 2-3. At 3-month control, 29 out of 38 patients recovering from AKI (76%) presented CKD. AKD stage was significantly correlated with the risk of CKD development, which, resulted higher in patients with lower baseline eGFR. Conclusions: AKI might represent a risk factor for the development of chronic kidney damage, even in noncritically ill patients.
Acute kidney disease
Acute kidney injury
Chronic kidney disease
Dialysis independence
Noncritically ill patients
Renal recovery
Creatinine
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Kidney
Renal Dialysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Acute Kidney Injury
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1070748
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