Background: Zygomatic implants have been introduced to rehabilitate edentulous patients with severely atrophic maxillae. Their use has been reported by several studies, describing high overall survival rates at medium-long follow-up. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze if a few patient-related and implant-related features are correlated with implant success or the onset of complications. Materials and methods: Data of patients treated with zygomatic implants between May 2005 and November 2012 at three private clinics were collected and retrospectively analyzed. For each implant, the following data were collected: implant length, insertion path, ridge atrophy and sinus characteristics (width, pneumatization, thickness of mucosae, patency of sinus ostium). General patient characteristics and health status data were also recorded. The outcomes evaluated were implant failure, infective complications, early neurologic complications and overall complications. Results: A total of 33 patients (14 men, 17 women, mean age 59.1) that received 67 zygomatic implants were included in the study. The mean duration of the follow-up was of 141.6 months (min 109; max 198). In this period, a total of 16 (23.88%) implants in 8 (24.24%) patients were removed and 17 (51.51%) patients with 36 (53.73%) implants reported complications. Immediate loading resulted in a significantly lower risk of complications compared with the two-stage prosthetic rehabilitation (OR: 0.04, p = 0.002). A thickness of the sinus mucosa > 3 mm emerged to be correlated with a greater occurrence of infective complications (OR: 3.39, p = 0.019). Severe and extreme pneumatization of the sinus was significantly correlated with the incidence of overall complications (p = 0.037) and implant failure (p = 0.044). A large sinus width was predisposed to a higher risk of neurologic complications, infective complications and implant failure (p = 0.036, p = 0.032, p = 0.04, respectively). Conclusions: zygomatic implants are an alternative procedure for atrophic ridge rehabilitation when a conventional implant placement is not possible. Several clinical and anatomical factors can have a significant role in complication occurrence.

Retrospective Analysis of Clinical and Radiologic Data Regarding Zygomatic Implant Rehabilitation with a Long-Term Follow-Up

Nocini, Riccardo;Olivo, Antonio
2021

Abstract

Background: Zygomatic implants have been introduced to rehabilitate edentulous patients with severely atrophic maxillae. Their use has been reported by several studies, describing high overall survival rates at medium-long follow-up. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze if a few patient-related and implant-related features are correlated with implant success or the onset of complications. Materials and methods: Data of patients treated with zygomatic implants between May 2005 and November 2012 at three private clinics were collected and retrospectively analyzed. For each implant, the following data were collected: implant length, insertion path, ridge atrophy and sinus characteristics (width, pneumatization, thickness of mucosae, patency of sinus ostium). General patient characteristics and health status data were also recorded. The outcomes evaluated were implant failure, infective complications, early neurologic complications and overall complications. Results: A total of 33 patients (14 men, 17 women, mean age 59.1) that received 67 zygomatic implants were included in the study. The mean duration of the follow-up was of 141.6 months (min 109; max 198). In this period, a total of 16 (23.88%) implants in 8 (24.24%) patients were removed and 17 (51.51%) patients with 36 (53.73%) implants reported complications. Immediate loading resulted in a significantly lower risk of complications compared with the two-stage prosthetic rehabilitation (OR: 0.04, p = 0.002). A thickness of the sinus mucosa > 3 mm emerged to be correlated with a greater occurrence of infective complications (OR: 3.39, p = 0.019). Severe and extreme pneumatization of the sinus was significantly correlated with the incidence of overall complications (p = 0.037) and implant failure (p = 0.044). A large sinus width was predisposed to a higher risk of neurologic complications, infective complications and implant failure (p = 0.036, p = 0.032, p = 0.04, respectively). Conclusions: zygomatic implants are an alternative procedure for atrophic ridge rehabilitation when a conventional implant placement is not possible. Several clinical and anatomical factors can have a significant role in complication occurrence.
implant failure
oral and maxillo-facial surgery
success rate
zygomatic implants
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Jaw, Edentulous
Zygoma
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1070726
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