Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common cause of episodic vertigo in children. Vertigo, nausea, dizziness and unsteadiness are often complained of by children with migraine, which can precede, follow or be present simultaneously with headache. The aim of this study was to use posturography to investigate the visually evoked postural responses (VEPRs) of children with VM and compare them to data obtained from children with primary headache (M) and controls (C). Twenty children diagnosed as affected by VM, nineteen children with M without aura and twenty healthy subjects were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Posturography was performed by a standardized stabilometric force-platform (Svep-Politecnica) in the following conditions: open eyes (OE), closed eyes (CE) and during full-field horizontal optokinetic stimulation (OKN-S). Electronystagmography was performed simultaneously to analyze optokinetic reflex parameters. In the OE condition, no difference was found between groups with respect to body sway area. In contrast, this parameter increased in the two pathological groups with respect to controls in the CE condition. The optokinetic stimulations also induced a similar increase of body sway area in the M group relative to controls, but a further increase was elicited in the VM group. Electronystagmographic recording also revealed different optokinetic reflex parameters in the latter groups. This study disclosed an abnormal sensitivity of children with M and VM to full-field moving scenes and a consequent destabilization of posture, as documented by the abnormal VEPRs. Children with VM were particularly exposed to this risk. Possible clinical implications of these findings are discussed

Visually Evoked Postural Responses (VEPRs) in Children with Vestibular Migraine

Nocini, Riccardo;Monzani, Daniele;
2021

Abstract

Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common cause of episodic vertigo in children. Vertigo, nausea, dizziness and unsteadiness are often complained of by children with migraine, which can precede, follow or be present simultaneously with headache. The aim of this study was to use posturography to investigate the visually evoked postural responses (VEPRs) of children with VM and compare them to data obtained from children with primary headache (M) and controls (C). Twenty children diagnosed as affected by VM, nineteen children with M without aura and twenty healthy subjects were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Posturography was performed by a standardized stabilometric force-platform (Svep-Politecnica) in the following conditions: open eyes (OE), closed eyes (CE) and during full-field horizontal optokinetic stimulation (OKN-S). Electronystagmography was performed simultaneously to analyze optokinetic reflex parameters. In the OE condition, no difference was found between groups with respect to body sway area. In contrast, this parameter increased in the two pathological groups with respect to controls in the CE condition. The optokinetic stimulations also induced a similar increase of body sway area in the M group relative to controls, but a further increase was elicited in the VM group. Electronystagmographic recording also revealed different optokinetic reflex parameters in the latter groups. This study disclosed an abnormal sensitivity of children with M and VM to full-field moving scenes and a consequent destabilization of posture, as documented by the abnormal VEPRs. Children with VM were particularly exposed to this risk. Possible clinical implications of these findings are discussed
migraine; optokinetic stimulation; posturography; visual–vestibular mismatch; nystagmus
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1070410
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