OBJECTIVES: To evaluate intrauterine adhesion formation after laparoscopic and laparotomic myomectomy. DESIGN: Prospective, multicenter, observational study (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT04030273). METHODS: We included patients after laparotomic and laparoscopic myomectomy. All patients underwent post-surgical diagnostic hysteroscopy, after three months. The intrauterine adhesion rate and associated factors were investigated. RESULTS: Between January 2020 and December 2020, 38 and 24 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic and laparotomic myomectomy, respectively. All diagnostic hysteroscopies were performed in the office setting without complications. Intrauterine adhesions were identified in 19.4% of women (95% CI of 9 - 29%). Factors univariately associated (p <0.2) with the presence of intrauterine adhesions after myomectomy were previous uterine surgery, the surgical approach (laparoscopic or laparotomic), the number of removed fibroids, the type and diameter of the largest myoma, and the opening of the uterine cavity. In the multivariable analysis, only the opening of the uterine cavity (OR 51.99; 95% CI, 4.53 - 596.28) and the laparotomic approach (OR, 16.19; 95% CI, 1.66 - 158.35) were independently associated with the identification of intrauterine adhesions after myomectomy. LIMITATIONS: One of the main limitations of our study is that we used uterine manipulator only in laparoscopic group; in addition, we did not perform a pre-operative hysteroscopy to evaluate the rate of intrauterine adhesions potentially present even before the myomectomy. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of intrauterine adhesions after three months from surgery was significantly associated with the opening of the uterine cavity and the laparotomic approach.

Prevalence of Intrauterine Adhesions after Myomectomy: A Prospective Multicenter Observational Study

Garzon, Simone;Dababou, Susan;Uccella, Stefano;
2022

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate intrauterine adhesion formation after laparoscopic and laparotomic myomectomy. DESIGN: Prospective, multicenter, observational study (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT04030273). METHODS: We included patients after laparotomic and laparoscopic myomectomy. All patients underwent post-surgical diagnostic hysteroscopy, after three months. The intrauterine adhesion rate and associated factors were investigated. RESULTS: Between January 2020 and December 2020, 38 and 24 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic and laparotomic myomectomy, respectively. All diagnostic hysteroscopies were performed in the office setting without complications. Intrauterine adhesions were identified in 19.4% of women (95% CI of 9 - 29%). Factors univariately associated (p <0.2) with the presence of intrauterine adhesions after myomectomy were previous uterine surgery, the surgical approach (laparoscopic or laparotomic), the number of removed fibroids, the type and diameter of the largest myoma, and the opening of the uterine cavity. In the multivariable analysis, only the opening of the uterine cavity (OR 51.99; 95% CI, 4.53 - 596.28) and the laparotomic approach (OR, 16.19; 95% CI, 1.66 - 158.35) were independently associated with the identification of intrauterine adhesions after myomectomy. LIMITATIONS: One of the main limitations of our study is that we used uterine manipulator only in laparoscopic group; in addition, we did not perform a pre-operative hysteroscopy to evaluate the rate of intrauterine adhesions potentially present even before the myomectomy. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of intrauterine adhesions after three months from surgery was significantly associated with the opening of the uterine cavity and the laparotomic approach.
intrauterine adhesions
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1070040
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