Introduction/background: Patients with advanced NSCLC who experience disease progression after second-line therapy might receive further active treatment. LIFE was an Italian cohort multicenter observational study composed of a cross-sectional and a longitudinal phase. Patients and methods: In the longitudinal phase, described here, the primary aim was to determine the proportion of patients receiving third-line therapy among those who received second-line active treatment according to clinical practice. The proportion of patients receiving further treatment lines was also estimated. Results: The longitudinal phase was conducted between January and August 2012. Of 464 patients who began second-line therapy outside of clinical trials within the baseline evaluation, 56 (12.1%) were still receiving second-line therapy at the end of the observation period and 17 (3.7%) withdrew during or after second-line therapy. Of the remaining 391 patients, 158 (40.4%) received third-line treatment outside of clinical trials: 93 received a third-line chemotherapy and 65 a targeted agent. The main reason for interrupting third-line treatment was disease progression or death. During the same observation period, 25 of 113 patients who completed a third-line therapy received a fourth line of treatment. From diagnosis of NSCLC to the end of observation, biomarkers were tested in 323 patients (59.7%): epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in 315 (58.2%), Kirsten rat sarcoma 2 viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations in 83 (15.3%) and Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocation in 84 (15.5%). Conclusion: In Italian clinical practice, the proportion of patients with advanced NSCLC receiving more than 2 treatment lines of therapy is not negligible.

Management of Italian patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer after second-line treatment: results of the longitudinal phase of the LIFE observational study

Novello, Silvia;Santo, Antonio;Michele, Milella
2014-01-01

Abstract

Introduction/background: Patients with advanced NSCLC who experience disease progression after second-line therapy might receive further active treatment. LIFE was an Italian cohort multicenter observational study composed of a cross-sectional and a longitudinal phase. Patients and methods: In the longitudinal phase, described here, the primary aim was to determine the proportion of patients receiving third-line therapy among those who received second-line active treatment according to clinical practice. The proportion of patients receiving further treatment lines was also estimated. Results: The longitudinal phase was conducted between January and August 2012. Of 464 patients who began second-line therapy outside of clinical trials within the baseline evaluation, 56 (12.1%) were still receiving second-line therapy at the end of the observation period and 17 (3.7%) withdrew during or after second-line therapy. Of the remaining 391 patients, 158 (40.4%) received third-line treatment outside of clinical trials: 93 received a third-line chemotherapy and 65 a targeted agent. The main reason for interrupting third-line treatment was disease progression or death. During the same observation period, 25 of 113 patients who completed a third-line therapy received a fourth line of treatment. From diagnosis of NSCLC to the end of observation, biomarkers were tested in 323 patients (59.7%): epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in 315 (58.2%), Kirsten rat sarcoma 2 viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations in 83 (15.3%) and Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocation in 84 (15.5%). Conclusion: In Italian clinical practice, the proportion of patients with advanced NSCLC receiving more than 2 treatment lines of therapy is not negligible.
Chemotherapy
EGFR
Erlotinib
NSCLC
Third-line
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase
Antineoplastic Agents
Biomarkers, Tumor
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung
Cohort Studies
Disease Progression
ErbB Receptors
Erlotinib Hydrochloride
Female
Humans
Italy
Longitudinal Studies
Lung Neoplasms
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Proto-Oncogene Proteins
Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras)
Quinazolines
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
ras Proteins
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1066733
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