Purpose Tumor induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare disease of mineral metabolism, whose clinical picture is dominated by hypophosphatemia usually due to an excess of circulating FGF23 produced by small mesenchymal tumors. Data on the real prevalence of the disease are lacking, with the knowledge of the disease mainly relying on case reports and small case series. No estimate is available on the prevalence of uncured TIO. Methods National multi-center, cross-sectional and retrospective study on persistent or recurrent cases of TIO followed in referral centers for bone diseases; systematic review of the published persistent and recurrent cases of TIO. Data from patients consecutively evaluated in referral Italian centers for bone diseases were collected; a PubMed search on persistent, recurrent and unoperable cases of TIO was carried out. Results Sixteen patients (mean age at diagnosis 52.5 +/- 10.6 years) with persistent (n = 6, 37,5%), recurrent (n = 7, 43.7%) or not operable (n = 3, 18.8%) TIO were described. Delay in diagnosis (2.5 +/- 1.3 years) was demonstrated. All patients experienced fragility fractures or pseudofractures and disabling bone and muscle pain. BMD was significantly reduced (mean T-score -2.7 +/- 1.7 and -2.7 +/- 0.9 at lumbar spine and femoral neck, respectively). Fourteen patients were maintained under therapy with phosphate salts and calcitriol, while in 2 patients therapy with burosumab, an anti-FGF23 antibody, was commenced. Conclusion A significant number of patients with TIO remain either undiagnosed for tumor localization or tumor recur or persist after surgery. These patients with active disease represent possible candidates for burosumab treatment.

Persistence and recurrence in tumor-induced osteomalacia: A systematic review of the literature and results from a national survey/case series

Bertoldo, Francesco
Investigation
;
Crotti, Chiara;Gatti, Davide;Ombretta, Viapiana;Sella, Stefania;Setti, Angela;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Purpose Tumor induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare disease of mineral metabolism, whose clinical picture is dominated by hypophosphatemia usually due to an excess of circulating FGF23 produced by small mesenchymal tumors. Data on the real prevalence of the disease are lacking, with the knowledge of the disease mainly relying on case reports and small case series. No estimate is available on the prevalence of uncured TIO. Methods National multi-center, cross-sectional and retrospective study on persistent or recurrent cases of TIO followed in referral centers for bone diseases; systematic review of the published persistent and recurrent cases of TIO. Data from patients consecutively evaluated in referral Italian centers for bone diseases were collected; a PubMed search on persistent, recurrent and unoperable cases of TIO was carried out. Results Sixteen patients (mean age at diagnosis 52.5 +/- 10.6 years) with persistent (n = 6, 37,5%), recurrent (n = 7, 43.7%) or not operable (n = 3, 18.8%) TIO were described. Delay in diagnosis (2.5 +/- 1.3 years) was demonstrated. All patients experienced fragility fractures or pseudofractures and disabling bone and muscle pain. BMD was significantly reduced (mean T-score -2.7 +/- 1.7 and -2.7 +/- 0.9 at lumbar spine and femoral neck, respectively). Fourteen patients were maintained under therapy with phosphate salts and calcitriol, while in 2 patients therapy with burosumab, an anti-FGF23 antibody, was commenced. Conclusion A significant number of patients with TIO remain either undiagnosed for tumor localization or tumor recur or persist after surgery. These patients with active disease represent possible candidates for burosumab treatment.
Burosumab
FGF23
Hypophosphatemia
Phosphate
TIO
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1063778
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