Introduction Speech is the result of multimodal or multi-sensorial processes. The auditory and visual components of language provide the child with information crucial to the processing of speech. The language acquisition process is influenced by the child’s ability to integrate information from multimodal (audio and visual) sources and to focus attention on the relevant cues in the environment; this is selective visual attention. This dissertation will explore the relationship between children’s selective visual attention and their early language skills. Several recent studies with infant populations have hypothesised or tested the relationship between children’s selective visual attention towards specific regions of the talking face (i.e., the eyes or the mouth) and their language skills. These studies have tried to show how concomitant or longitudinal language skills can explain looking behaviours. In most cases, these studies have speculated on how this relationship is mediated by the child’s level of language expertise (this is known as the language expertise hypothesis). However, no studies until now, to the best of our knowledge, have investigated the child’s linguistic skills using spontaneous language measures. Aims The dissertation has one broad aim, within which there are three particular aims. The broad aim is to examine the phenomenon of selective visual attention toward the face in both a laboratory and a naturalistic setting, and its relationship with language development. The three particular aims are as follows. The first aim is to synthesise and analyse the factors that might determine different looking patterns in infants during audiovisual tasks using dynamic faces; it describes how the literature explains these patterns in relation to aspects of language development. The second aim is to experimentally investigate the child’s selective visual attention towards a specific region of the adult’s face (the eyes and the mouth) in a task using the eye-tracking method. In particular, the study will explore two 12 questions: First, how do age and language condition (exposure to native vs non-native speech) affect looking behaviour in children? Second, are a child’s looking behaviours related to vocal production at the time of the experiment and to vocabulary rates three months later, and if so, how? The third aim is to understand whether selective attention towards the face or other parts of the visual scene (i.e. the object or elsewhere) is influenced or explained by the child’s vocal skills at the time of the task. And can the episodes of fixation towards the adult’s face be predicted by specific phonological and semantic properties (i.e., pre-canonical vocalisations, babbling, words) of the child’s speech? Method For the first study, a systematic review of the literature was conducted, exploring four bibliographic databases and using specific inclusion criteria to select the records. For the second study, eye movements towards a dynamic face (on a screen), speaking in the child’s native language (Italian) and a non-native language (English), were tracked using an eye-tracker in 26 infants between 6 and 14 months. Two groups were created based on age (G1, M = 7 months, N = 15 infants; G2, M = 12 months, N = 11 infants). Each child’s language skill was assessed twice: at the time of the experiment (through direct observation, Time 1) and three months later (through MB-CDI, Time 2). Two groups were created, based on the child’s vocal production (Time 1, latent class cluster analysis): a high class (higher percentage of babbling and words) vs a low class (higher percentage of pre-canonical vocalisations). For the third study, the looking behaviour of the same 29 children between 12 and 19 months was tracked, using both a stationary video camera and a head-mounted camera on the mother’s head during a single object task. During the task, children were exposed to a set of audiovisual stimuli, real words and non-words, chosen based on the parents’ reports and their MB-CDI answers. The child’s looking behaviour was coded offline second-by-second for a total of 116 sessions. The coding relates to specific areas of interest, i.e., the face, the object or 13 elsewhere. The vocal production of each child was quantified using a LENA device, and their speech during a play period with their mothers was transcribed phonetically. Results The systematic search of the literature (Chapter 2) identified 19 papers. Some tried to clarify the role played by audiovisual factors in support of speech perception (provided by looking towards the eyes or the mouth of a talking face). Others related selective visual attention towards specific areas of the adult’s face to the child’s competence in terms of linguistic or social skills, this leads to correspondingly different lines of interpretation. The first empirical study (Chapter 3) shows that Italian children older than 12 months displayed a greater interest in the mouth area, especially when they were exposed to their native language. This accords with the more recent literature but contrasts with the language expertise hypothesis. The second significant result of Chapter 3 is that children who had a higher level of production in terms of babbling and words at the time of the experiment looked more towards the mouth area. The study reported in Chapter 3 also demonstrated a positive association between the child’s looking to the mouth and their expressive vocabulary as measured (using the MB-CDI) three months after the experiment The second empirical study (Chapter 4) shows a significant difference in the looking time towards the adult’s face between children with low- and high-vocal production in a naturalistic setting. More specifically, from this study, we find two things. Firstly, we found that the children who produced more advanced vocal forms (higher amount of babbling and word production) looked more towards the adult’s face, especially when exposed to non-words. Secondly, that a significant relationship exists between the episodes of fixation towards the adult’s face and the child’s vocal skills (i.e., pre-canonical vocalisations, babbling, words); babbling productions predicted the episodes of face fixation in the task as a whole, for both words and non-words. 14 Conclusion Linguistic and social-based hypotheses attempting to explain the differences in the selective visual attention phenomenon emerged from the literature review. The empirical studies presented in this thesis bring two original contributions to this research field. First, our findings reinforce the idea that the mouth and, more generally the face, provide crucial visual cues when acquiring a language. Secondly, our results demonstrate that language knowledge and language skills at the time the child was observed significantly help to explain different looking behaviours. In other words, we can conclude that each child’s attention to faces is shaped by their own linguistic characteristics.

Introduzione Le componenti uditive e visive del linguaggio offrono al bambino informazioni cruciali per il processamento del parlato. L’abilità del bambino di integrare informazioni da diverse fonti multimodali (audio e visive) e di focalizzare l’attenzione sui segnali rilevanti presenti nell’ambiente circostante (selective visual attention) sono aspetti importanti che influenzano le prime fasi di acquisizione di una lingua. Alcuni recenti studi hanno ipotizzato e testato la relazione tra attenzione selettiva visiva verso specifiche aree del volto parlante (occhi o bocca) e le abilità linguistiche di bambini nei primi anni di vita. Molti ricercatori hanno speculato su come questa relazione potesse essere mediata dal livello di expetise del bambino, a livello linguistico (language expertise hypothesis), ma nessuno studio, fin ad ora, ha cercato di approfondire questa ipotesi, andando ad investigare le abilità linguistiche dei bambini usando misure di linguaggio spontaneo. Altri studi, hanno cercato di esplorare come diversi comportamenti attentivi verso specifiche aree del volto (occhi o bocca) fossero correlati alle abilità linguistiche concomitanti o longitudinali dei partecipanti. In molti casi, i risultati di questi studi hanno confermato l’esistenza di relazioni significative tra attenzione visiva selettiva e abilità linguistiche al tempo dell’esperimento o qualche mese dopo. Obiettivi L’obiettivo generale di questa tesi è quello di esaminare il fenomeno dell’attenzione selettiva visiva verso il volto e la sua relazione con lo sviluppo del linguaggio sia in un setting di laboratorio sia in un contesto naturalistico. In particolare, tre sono gli obiettivi specifici: - il primo obiettivo specifico è quello di sintetizzare e analizzare i fattori individuati dalla letteratura di riferimento che possono determinare diversi patterns di attenzione selettiva visiva nei bambini durante un compito audiovisivo. Ed in particolare, descrivere come la letteratura spiega questi patterns in relazione agli aspetti dello sviluppo del linguaggio; 8 - il secondo obiettivo specifico è quello di analizzare sperimentalmente l’attenzione selettiva visiva del bambino verso specifiche aree del volto (occhi e bocca) durante un compito di esposizione audiovisivo. In particolare, lo studio è volto ad indagare due aspetti. Il primo aspetto riguarda l’età e la condizione linguistica (esposizione ad una lingua nativa vs una lingua non nativa) dei partecipanti e come queste influenzano l’attenzione selettiva visiva verso specifiche aree del volto. Il secondo aspetto riguarda l’esplorazione dell’esistenza di una correlazione tra comportamento attentivo dei bambini la produzione vocale al tempo dell’esperimento e all’ampiezza del vocabolario tre mesi dopo; - il terzo obiettivo specifico è quello di capire se l’attenzione a volti o altre parti della scena visiva (oggetto, altre parti della stanza) è influenzato o spigato dalle abilità vocali del bambino al tempo del task e se gli episodi di fissazione al volto adulto possono essere predetti da specifiche proprietà fonologiche e semantiche del parlato del bambino. Metodo Per quanto concerne il primo studio, una rassegna sistematica della letteratura è stata condotta esplorando quattro fonti bibliografiche e usando specifici criteri di inclusione per selezionare la letteratura scientifica di interesse. Per quanto riguarda il secondo studio, i movimenti oculari verso un volto parlante la lingua nativa (Italiano) e non-nativa (Inglese) di 26 bambini tra i 6 e i 14 mesi sono stati tracciati usando l’eye tracker. Due gruppi sono stati creati sulla base dell’età (G1, M = 7 mesi, N = 15 bambini; G2, M = 12 mesi, N = 11 bambini). Ogni competenza linguistica del bambino è stata valutata due volte, al tempo dell’esperimento, attraverso l’osservazione diretta e tre mesi dopo, attraverso il MB-CDI. Due gruppi sono stati creati sulla base della produzione vocale dei bambini (vocalizzi pre-canonici, babbling, parole) attraverso un latent class cluster analysis: una classe vocale “alta” (percentuale di babbling e parole più alta) e una classe vocale “bassa” (percentuale maggiore di produzioni pre-canoniche). Per quanto concerne il terzo studio, il comportamento attentivo di 29 bambini tra i 12 e i 19 mesi è stato esplorato utilizzando sia una videocamera stazionaria 9 (posizionata di fronte alla diade) e una go-pro (posizionata sulla fronte del caregiver di riferimento) durante un semplice task linguistico (single object task). Durante il task i bambini sono stati esposti ad un set di stimoli audiovisivi, parole vere e non parole, scelte sulla base dei report dei genitori e sulle risposte al MB-CDI. Il comportamento attentivo dei bambini è stato codificato offline, secondo per secondo per un totale di 116 sessioni. La codifica ha riguardato specifiche aree di interesse (il volto, l’oggetto, o altre parti della stanza). La produzione vocale per ogni bambino è stata quantificata usando LENA e le produzioni del bambino (vocalizzi pre-canonici, babbling, parole) durante un periodo di gioco con la mamma sono state trascritte foneticamente. Risultati La rassegna sistematica della letteratura (Capitolo 2) ha portato all’identificazione di 19 articoli. Alcuni dei quali volti a chiarire il ruolo giocato da diversi fattori nel spiegare diversi patterns attentivi. Altri interessati ad indagare la correlazione tra l’attenzione selettiva visiva verso specifiche aree del volto alle competenze linguistiche o sociali dei partecipanti, aprendo le porte a diverse linee interpretative. Il primo studio empirico (Capitolo 3) ha messo in luce che i bambini italiani con età superiore ai 12 mesi, mostrano maggiore interesse verso l’area della bocca, specialmente quando esposti alla lingua nativa. Questo è in accordo con la recente letteratura, ma contrasta con la language expertise hypotesis (secondo la quale bambini attorno all’anno di età dovrebbero spostare il focus attentivo dalla bocca agli occhi). Il secondo risultato emerso in questo lavoro empirico riguarda l’interesse verso l’area della bocca per i bambini che hanno maggiori livelli di produzione in termini di babbling e parole al tempo dell’esperimento. Il terzo risultato riguarda l’associazione positiva tra il comportamento attentivo verso la bocca ed il vocabolario espressivo dei bambini misurato tramite questionario (MB-CDI) tre mesi dopo l’esperimento. Dal secondo studio empirico (Capitolo 4) emerge una differenza significativa in termini di tempo attentivo verso il volto adulto tra i bambini del gruppo linguistico “alto” e “basso” durante un task condotto in un contesto naturalistico. 10 In particolare, da questo studio emergono due risultati interessanti: il primo è che i bambini che producono forme vocaliche più avanzate (babbling e parole) guardano di più verso il volto adulto, specialmente quando esposti alle non-parole. Il secondo riguarda l’esistenza di una relazione significativa tra gli episodi di fissazione al volto e le abilità vocaliche del bambino al tempo del task (vocalizzi pre-canonici, babbling e parole). In particolare, emerge che la quantità di babbling prodotto ha un ruolo nel predire gli episodi di fissazione al volto durante il task, sia per le parole sia per le non parole. Conclusioni Diverse ipotesi linguistiche e sociali sono state avanzate per spiegare le differenze emerse dalla rassegna della letteratura in relazione al fenomeno dell’attenzione selettiva visiva. Gli studi empirici presentati in questa tesi hanno portato due contributi originali in quest’ambito di ricerca. Da un lato, i nostri risultati confermano l’idea che la bocca e, più in generale, il volto forniscono segnali visivi cruciali nelle prime fasi di acquisizione del linguaggio. Dall’altro lato, i risultati hanno messo in luce che la conoscenza linguistica e le abilità linguistiche dei partecipanti aiutano a spiegare diversi comportamenti attentivi. In altre parole, è possibile dire che l’attenzione selettiva ai volti, o a specifiche aree di questi, è spiegata dalle conoscenze e abilità linguistiche attuali dei partecipanti.

Multi-Sensoriality In Language Acquisition: The Relationship Between Selective Visual Attention Towards The Adult’s Face And Language Skills

Bastianello, T.
2022-01-01

Abstract

Introduzione Le componenti uditive e visive del linguaggio offrono al bambino informazioni cruciali per il processamento del parlato. L’abilità del bambino di integrare informazioni da diverse fonti multimodali (audio e visive) e di focalizzare l’attenzione sui segnali rilevanti presenti nell’ambiente circostante (selective visual attention) sono aspetti importanti che influenzano le prime fasi di acquisizione di una lingua. Alcuni recenti studi hanno ipotizzato e testato la relazione tra attenzione selettiva visiva verso specifiche aree del volto parlante (occhi o bocca) e le abilità linguistiche di bambini nei primi anni di vita. Molti ricercatori hanno speculato su come questa relazione potesse essere mediata dal livello di expetise del bambino, a livello linguistico (language expertise hypothesis), ma nessuno studio, fin ad ora, ha cercato di approfondire questa ipotesi, andando ad investigare le abilità linguistiche dei bambini usando misure di linguaggio spontaneo. Altri studi, hanno cercato di esplorare come diversi comportamenti attentivi verso specifiche aree del volto (occhi o bocca) fossero correlati alle abilità linguistiche concomitanti o longitudinali dei partecipanti. In molti casi, i risultati di questi studi hanno confermato l’esistenza di relazioni significative tra attenzione visiva selettiva e abilità linguistiche al tempo dell’esperimento o qualche mese dopo. Obiettivi L’obiettivo generale di questa tesi è quello di esaminare il fenomeno dell’attenzione selettiva visiva verso il volto e la sua relazione con lo sviluppo del linguaggio sia in un setting di laboratorio sia in un contesto naturalistico. In particolare, tre sono gli obiettivi specifici: - il primo obiettivo specifico è quello di sintetizzare e analizzare i fattori individuati dalla letteratura di riferimento che possono determinare diversi patterns di attenzione selettiva visiva nei bambini durante un compito audiovisivo. Ed in particolare, descrivere come la letteratura spiega questi patterns in relazione agli aspetti dello sviluppo del linguaggio; 8 - il secondo obiettivo specifico è quello di analizzare sperimentalmente l’attenzione selettiva visiva del bambino verso specifiche aree del volto (occhi e bocca) durante un compito di esposizione audiovisivo. In particolare, lo studio è volto ad indagare due aspetti. Il primo aspetto riguarda l’età e la condizione linguistica (esposizione ad una lingua nativa vs una lingua non nativa) dei partecipanti e come queste influenzano l’attenzione selettiva visiva verso specifiche aree del volto. Il secondo aspetto riguarda l’esplorazione dell’esistenza di una correlazione tra comportamento attentivo dei bambini la produzione vocale al tempo dell’esperimento e all’ampiezza del vocabolario tre mesi dopo; - il terzo obiettivo specifico è quello di capire se l’attenzione a volti o altre parti della scena visiva (oggetto, altre parti della stanza) è influenzato o spigato dalle abilità vocali del bambino al tempo del task e se gli episodi di fissazione al volto adulto possono essere predetti da specifiche proprietà fonologiche e semantiche del parlato del bambino. Metodo Per quanto concerne il primo studio, una rassegna sistematica della letteratura è stata condotta esplorando quattro fonti bibliografiche e usando specifici criteri di inclusione per selezionare la letteratura scientifica di interesse. Per quanto riguarda il secondo studio, i movimenti oculari verso un volto parlante la lingua nativa (Italiano) e non-nativa (Inglese) di 26 bambini tra i 6 e i 14 mesi sono stati tracciati usando l’eye tracker. Due gruppi sono stati creati sulla base dell’età (G1, M = 7 mesi, N = 15 bambini; G2, M = 12 mesi, N = 11 bambini). Ogni competenza linguistica del bambino è stata valutata due volte, al tempo dell’esperimento, attraverso l’osservazione diretta e tre mesi dopo, attraverso il MB-CDI. Due gruppi sono stati creati sulla base della produzione vocale dei bambini (vocalizzi pre-canonici, babbling, parole) attraverso un latent class cluster analysis: una classe vocale “alta” (percentuale di babbling e parole più alta) e una classe vocale “bassa” (percentuale maggiore di produzioni pre-canoniche). Per quanto concerne il terzo studio, il comportamento attentivo di 29 bambini tra i 12 e i 19 mesi è stato esplorato utilizzando sia una videocamera stazionaria 9 (posizionata di fronte alla diade) e una go-pro (posizionata sulla fronte del caregiver di riferimento) durante un semplice task linguistico (single object task). Durante il task i bambini sono stati esposti ad un set di stimoli audiovisivi, parole vere e non parole, scelte sulla base dei report dei genitori e sulle risposte al MB-CDI. Il comportamento attentivo dei bambini è stato codificato offline, secondo per secondo per un totale di 116 sessioni. La codifica ha riguardato specifiche aree di interesse (il volto, l’oggetto, o altre parti della stanza). La produzione vocale per ogni bambino è stata quantificata usando LENA e le produzioni del bambino (vocalizzi pre-canonici, babbling, parole) durante un periodo di gioco con la mamma sono state trascritte foneticamente. Risultati La rassegna sistematica della letteratura (Capitolo 2) ha portato all’identificazione di 19 articoli. Alcuni dei quali volti a chiarire il ruolo giocato da diversi fattori nel spiegare diversi patterns attentivi. Altri interessati ad indagare la correlazione tra l’attenzione selettiva visiva verso specifiche aree del volto alle competenze linguistiche o sociali dei partecipanti, aprendo le porte a diverse linee interpretative. Il primo studio empirico (Capitolo 3) ha messo in luce che i bambini italiani con età superiore ai 12 mesi, mostrano maggiore interesse verso l’area della bocca, specialmente quando esposti alla lingua nativa. Questo è in accordo con la recente letteratura, ma contrasta con la language expertise hypotesis (secondo la quale bambini attorno all’anno di età dovrebbero spostare il focus attentivo dalla bocca agli occhi). Il secondo risultato emerso in questo lavoro empirico riguarda l’interesse verso l’area della bocca per i bambini che hanno maggiori livelli di produzione in termini di babbling e parole al tempo dell’esperimento. Il terzo risultato riguarda l’associazione positiva tra il comportamento attentivo verso la bocca ed il vocabolario espressivo dei bambini misurato tramite questionario (MB-CDI) tre mesi dopo l’esperimento. Dal secondo studio empirico (Capitolo 4) emerge una differenza significativa in termini di tempo attentivo verso il volto adulto tra i bambini del gruppo linguistico “alto” e “basso” durante un task condotto in un contesto naturalistico. 10 In particolare, da questo studio emergono due risultati interessanti: il primo è che i bambini che producono forme vocaliche più avanzate (babbling e parole) guardano di più verso il volto adulto, specialmente quando esposti alle non-parole. Il secondo riguarda l’esistenza di una relazione significativa tra gli episodi di fissazione al volto e le abilità vocaliche del bambino al tempo del task (vocalizzi pre-canonici, babbling e parole). In particolare, emerge che la quantità di babbling prodotto ha un ruolo nel predire gli episodi di fissazione al volto durante il task, sia per le parole sia per le non parole. Conclusioni Diverse ipotesi linguistiche e sociali sono state avanzate per spiegare le differenze emerse dalla rassegna della letteratura in relazione al fenomeno dell’attenzione selettiva visiva. Gli studi empirici presentati in questa tesi hanno portato due contributi originali in quest’ambito di ricerca. Da un lato, i nostri risultati confermano l’idea che la bocca e, più in generale, il volto forniscono segnali visivi cruciali nelle prime fasi di acquisizione del linguaggio. Dall’altro lato, i risultati hanno messo in luce che la conoscenza linguistica e le abilità linguistiche dei partecipanti aiutano a spiegare diversi comportamenti attentivi. In altre parole, è possibile dire che l’attenzione selettiva ai volti, o a specifiche aree di questi, è spiegata dalle conoscenze e abilità linguistiche attuali dei partecipanti.
selective attention
language development
Introduction Speech is the result of multimodal or multi-sensorial processes. The auditory and visual components of language provide the child with information crucial to the processing of speech. The language acquisition process is influenced by the child’s ability to integrate information from multimodal (audio and visual) sources and to focus attention on the relevant cues in the environment; this is selective visual attention. This dissertation will explore the relationship between children’s selective visual attention and their early language skills. Several recent studies with infant populations have hypothesised or tested the relationship between children’s selective visual attention towards specific regions of the talking face (i.e., the eyes or the mouth) and their language skills. These studies have tried to show how concomitant or longitudinal language skills can explain looking behaviours. In most cases, these studies have speculated on how this relationship is mediated by the child’s level of language expertise (this is known as the language expertise hypothesis). However, no studies until now, to the best of our knowledge, have investigated the child’s linguistic skills using spontaneous language measures. Aims The dissertation has one broad aim, within which there are three particular aims. The broad aim is to examine the phenomenon of selective visual attention toward the face in both a laboratory and a naturalistic setting, and its relationship with language development. The three particular aims are as follows. The first aim is to synthesise and analyse the factors that might determine different looking patterns in infants during audiovisual tasks using dynamic faces; it describes how the literature explains these patterns in relation to aspects of language development. The second aim is to experimentally investigate the child’s selective visual attention towards a specific region of the adult’s face (the eyes and the mouth) in a task using the eye-tracking method. In particular, the study will explore two 12 questions: First, how do age and language condition (exposure to native vs non-native speech) affect looking behaviour in children? Second, are a child’s looking behaviours related to vocal production at the time of the experiment and to vocabulary rates three months later, and if so, how? The third aim is to understand whether selective attention towards the face or other parts of the visual scene (i.e. the object or elsewhere) is influenced or explained by the child’s vocal skills at the time of the task. And can the episodes of fixation towards the adult’s face be predicted by specific phonological and semantic properties (i.e., pre-canonical vocalisations, babbling, words) of the child’s speech? Method For the first study, a systematic review of the literature was conducted, exploring four bibliographic databases and using specific inclusion criteria to select the records. For the second study, eye movements towards a dynamic face (on a screen), speaking in the child’s native language (Italian) and a non-native language (English), were tracked using an eye-tracker in 26 infants between 6 and 14 months. Two groups were created based on age (G1, M = 7 months, N = 15 infants; G2, M = 12 months, N = 11 infants). Each child’s language skill was assessed twice: at the time of the experiment (through direct observation, Time 1) and three months later (through MB-CDI, Time 2). Two groups were created, based on the child’s vocal production (Time 1, latent class cluster analysis): a high class (higher percentage of babbling and words) vs a low class (higher percentage of pre-canonical vocalisations). For the third study, the looking behaviour of the same 29 children between 12 and 19 months was tracked, using both a stationary video camera and a head-mounted camera on the mother’s head during a single object task. During the task, children were exposed to a set of audiovisual stimuli, real words and non-words, chosen based on the parents’ reports and their MB-CDI answers. The child’s looking behaviour was coded offline second-by-second for a total of 116 sessions. The coding relates to specific areas of interest, i.e., the face, the object or 13 elsewhere. The vocal production of each child was quantified using a LENA device, and their speech during a play period with their mothers was transcribed phonetically. Results The systematic search of the literature (Chapter 2) identified 19 papers. Some tried to clarify the role played by audiovisual factors in support of speech perception (provided by looking towards the eyes or the mouth of a talking face). Others related selective visual attention towards specific areas of the adult’s face to the child’s competence in terms of linguistic or social skills, this leads to correspondingly different lines of interpretation. The first empirical study (Chapter 3) shows that Italian children older than 12 months displayed a greater interest in the mouth area, especially when they were exposed to their native language. This accords with the more recent literature but contrasts with the language expertise hypothesis. The second significant result of Chapter 3 is that children who had a higher level of production in terms of babbling and words at the time of the experiment looked more towards the mouth area. The study reported in Chapter 3 also demonstrated a positive association between the child’s looking to the mouth and their expressive vocabulary as measured (using the MB-CDI) three months after the experiment The second empirical study (Chapter 4) shows a significant difference in the looking time towards the adult’s face between children with low- and high-vocal production in a naturalistic setting. More specifically, from this study, we find two things. Firstly, we found that the children who produced more advanced vocal forms (higher amount of babbling and word production) looked more towards the adult’s face, especially when exposed to non-words. Secondly, that a significant relationship exists between the episodes of fixation towards the adult’s face and the child’s vocal skills (i.e., pre-canonical vocalisations, babbling, words); babbling productions predicted the episodes of face fixation in the task as a whole, for both words and non-words. 14 Conclusion Linguistic and social-based hypotheses attempting to explain the differences in the selective visual attention phenomenon emerged from the literature review. The empirical studies presented in this thesis bring two original contributions to this research field. First, our findings reinforce the idea that the mouth and, more generally the face, provide crucial visual cues when acquiring a language. Secondly, our results demonstrate that language knowledge and language skills at the time the child was observed significantly help to explain different looking behaviours. In other words, we can conclude that each child’s attention to faces is shaped by their own linguistic characteristics.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
PhD Dissertation_Tamara Bastianello 2022_.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Tesi di dottorato
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 1.62 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.62 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1062118
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact